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Where to get really thin rubber sheets?

  1. Apr 1, 2013 #1
    Hey guys,

    I need to get some nitrile, latex, and rubber gum sheets for a project. The problem is, I need them to be really thin - 0.1 mm or thinner. And ideally, I would like to be able to pick what color I get.

    I spent a few days searching the web and not even Grainger has what I'm looking for. If anyone can find a good source, that'd be great.

    -Gene
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 1, 2013 #2

    Stephen Tashi

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    How uniform must the thickness be? You can buy liquid latex at art supply websites. Plasti Dip in a spray can is the new fad in decorating parts of car bodies.
     
  4. Apr 1, 2013 #3
    I'm not sure if that's as strong as latex film though. Or as abrasion resistant.
    These latex sheets have a tensile strength of 3800 PSI and 800% elongation. Would liquid latex be anywhere near that?

    http://www.rubbersheetroll.com/latex-rubber-film.htm [Broken]

    Besides, I would prefer nitrile or rubber gum sheets to natural latex. I need something more abrasion resistant.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 6, 2017
  5. Apr 1, 2013 #4
    Have you tried McMaster-Carr? They have a pretty good selection.
     
  6. Apr 2, 2013 #5
    Hmm actually it might be easier to get the chemicals to make the sheets myself.
    But if I made my own rubber sheets, will they be just as durable as pre-made ones?
     
  7. Apr 4, 2013 #6

    Danger

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    That sort of depends upon both the specific formulation (not all are pure) and the moulding process. I use the stuff exclusively for my prosthetic make-up effects (see my avatar for an example), and can say with certainty that its durability is directly proportional to the thickness (which is layered; don't just slather it on). On the other hand (pardon the expression), condoms consist of only a couple of layers of top-grade latex that is dip-moulded over test tubes. Even before my health deteriorated, I never managed to blast a hole through one.
     
  8. Apr 4, 2013 #7

    Evo

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    Danger, you're alive!!

    I have to say that I've seen a number of condoms rip open during normal use. And these were well known brands.
     
  9. Apr 4, 2013 #8

    Danger

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    Define "normal". :tongue:
    I feel an experiment coming on. Do you have plans for the next couple of months?



    I should mention that I have limited experience with rubbers. Since I'm a "serial monogamist", involved with women who were on permanent birth control and not disease risks, I've used them only for one-night-stands between relationships.
     
    Last edited: Apr 4, 2013
  10. Apr 4, 2013 #9
    If it's any consolation, I've put condoms over my head and inflated them with my nose to be about half the length of my body.. I'm 6 foot.... so 3-4 feet long and 10 inches around or so...
     
  11. Apr 4, 2013 #10

    Danger

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    Cripes! :bugeye:
    That's almost twice the size of mine. :redface:
     
  12. Apr 4, 2013 #11

    lisab

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    Try googling "dental dam material". Since these are used for medical purposes, there should be a supplier who has nitrile and latex...not sure about rubber gum, though.
     
  13. Apr 4, 2013 #12

    Evo

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    Oh, good one!
     
  14. Apr 4, 2013 #13
    Wait, so I need to layer the rubber if I want to make it myself? How do I do that? Do I just apply really thin layers over a substrate like how you would paint something? Just build up thickness slowly?
     
  15. Apr 5, 2013 #14

    Danger

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    Keep in mind that this is just what I do for Hallowe'en or party make-up. Professionals use foam latex or silicone. Another option of mine is gelatin. You make it like regular Jell-O, but with about 5 times less water. It comes out similar to latex, and lasts just about as long.
    Anyhow, as to the liquid latex: my best attempt at an explanation would be to suggest that you watch a couple of episodes of "Face Off". It airs on Space where I live; if you're in the US it might be on SyFi. Essentially, you take a negative cast of what you want, then spread your medium (latex) on the inside. When you peel it out, it is then ready to be glued onto your victim. Each layer that you add to the mould interior should be about the same as a coat of paint. You can then let it dry naturally, which theoretically can take over 12 hours, or cut it down to 5 minutes with a blow-drier.
    There are 2 main things to watch out for, and both are medical. I had to buy polyethylene condoms for a while because the lady of the moment was allergic to latex. Also, the material releases ammonia while drying, since that's what keeps it in liquid form for storage.
     
  16. Apr 6, 2013 #15
    Ok thanks for the info.

    Btw, is it the same thing for liquid nitrile rubber?
    Also, I see Chinese companies offering nitrile rubber sheets with a max tensile strength of only 3.1 MPa. Quality domestic companies offer nitrile sheets up to 8.7 MPa. But neither of them offer anything below 0.1mm or even close, so it doesn't even matter anyway.
     
  17. Apr 9, 2013 #16

    Danger

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    You're welcome, and I have no idea. My only way of finding out would be internet searching, which you would probably be much more efficient at than I am. (I'm still pretty illiterate when it comes to computer stuff. :redface:)

    edit: I just thought of something. Since you specified sheets as opposed to complicated forms, you might try spin-deposition. It's used for stuff like coating silicon wafers for semi-conductor chips, but I don't know whether or not it would work with something as viscous as the polymers that you need. Essentially, you put a flat surface (in your case I would recommend a glass plate) on a rapidly spinning turntable and drop your liquid material onto the centre. The spinning forces it outward and forms an amazingly even coating.
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2013
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