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Engineering Which is more prospective engineering or physics?

  1. Feb 13, 2013 #1
    Which career is show the most growth in todays world economy. Because I want to choose now what I want to focus on.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 13, 2013 #2

    Simon Bridge

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    Welcome to PF;
    If you are starting your studies now or shortly, you are asking the wrong question.
    What you need to do is figure out which is likely to be growing in such a way that by the time you graduate (3-5years) you are likely to be employed in the field.

    Todays growth tells you nothing by itself.

    It is also a bad way to pick a career path, since it leaves so much unconsidered, but that's your business right?
     
  4. Feb 13, 2013 #3

    lisab

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    Asking about which degree is more marketable is a legitimate question, IMO.

    I'd say your chances of employment are better with an engineering degree. When you have a physics degree, you have to market your skills to a hiring manager who may or may not be open minded. Engineers don't have to do that nearly as much -- even an HR person is familiar with what an engineer is :biggrin:.
     
  5. Feb 14, 2013 #4

    Simon Bridge

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    OTOH: it depends on what else you do and what sort of field you want to enter.

    Degrees do tend to label you so specialized degrees to the job tend to beat general ones. It used to be that BSc's could get management jobs for eg but now those jobs go to BBS grads.

    Engineering degrees tend to be more vocation-oriented than science degrees - but an employer calling for a scientist tends not to hire an engineer.

    If the plan is to get the Bachelors and leave, then it probably does not matter in terms of applying for any random job asking for a Bachelors degree... Google advertises for BSc all the time for eg. but when you go to the interview they are looking for specific skills which are not usually implicit in the degree.

    It is certainly a legit question - could use refining to produce a useful answer.
     
  6. Feb 14, 2013 #5
    So do you think either double majoring or majoring in physics and minoring in engineering because i would preferably be involved in the experimental side of whichever brach of physics i end up choosing and I heard that an engineering degree can help in experimental physics
     
  7. Feb 15, 2013 #6

    Simon Bridge

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    Another path is to pick one and keep an eye on the other - you will likely be able to cross-credit if you decide to shift majors later. You can tailor your earlier papers to keep your options open but you will need advise from the schools in question.

    The same goes for the double major.

    To my mind, best practice is to tackle the field that lights you up the most - that you find the most inspiring. Then, if you have any talent at all, the opportunities will find you: you just have to be alert for them. This approach maximizes your chance at happiness whatever you end up doing.
     
  8. Feb 16, 2013 #7
    Thanks that helps!
     
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