Who knows the proper name for this experiment

  • Thread starter rimblock
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In summary: Seriously, not a hoax afaik. I wish i could remember the name. That said if there are any genies reading this, i have other priorties so PM me.Anyone?I looked up 'luminiferous aether motor' on google and couldn't find any reference to the experiment i described. Perhaps my explanation is incorrect(!), but i am sure i read a few articles that supported the same result ... 'that a motor restarted before a certain time required less energy to reach full speed'. Aether aside, does this result ring any bells? The energy saving was definitely not down to warm bearings or any other
  • #1
rimblock
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Hi,
I read about an experiment in which less energy than expected was required to restart a motor that had already been spinning. The explanation i read indicated that there was some sort of 'magnetic-sensitive ether' that continued to rotate after the motor had stopped, meaning that restarting it in the same direction could take advantage of the ether's momentum.

Your wisdom is greatly appreciated :-)
 
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  • #2
You'll get more replies if you clarify your question...
 
  • #3
Neo_Anderson said:
You'll get more replies if you clarify your question...

Ok i'll give it another shot!

I read about an experiment in which a motor was speed up to a high speed, then forced to stop. If the motor was then restarted within, say, 30 seconds, the amount of energy required to get the motor up to full speed was less than when it was first brought up to full speed.
The article metioned that some sort of rotating field that continued to move, eventhough the motor was stationary (as if the field had its own momentum that was loosely coupled to the rotational motion of the motor).

What is the name of this experiment?

thanks again.
 
  • #4
rimblock said:
Ok i'll give it another shot!

I read about an experiment in which a motor was speed up to a high speed, then forced to stop. If the motor was then restarted within, say, 30 seconds, the amount of energy required to get the motor up to full speed was less than when it was first brought up to full speed.
The article metioned that some sort of rotating field that continued to move, eventhough the motor was stationary (as if the field had its own momentum that was loosely coupled to the rotational motion of the motor).

What is the name of this experiment?

thanks again.

Someone must know!
 
  • #5
I'm not sure of the name of the experiment in question, but I would have to assume any difference in restart amperage would be due to residual magnetism. Possibly the coefficient of friction of warm bearings vs. cold ones too. I'd be interested in the actual experimental results if you ever find them. I have to assume it is a very small difference.
 
  • #6
denni89627 said:
I'm not sure of the name of the experiment in question, but I would have to assume any difference in restart amperage would be due to residual magnetism. Possibly the coefficient of friction of warm bearings vs. cold ones too. I'd be interested in the actual experimental results if you ever find them. I have to assume it is a very small difference.

Somebody must know! I'm sure i wasn't sleep reading..!
 
  • #7
rimblock said:
The explanation i read indicated that there was some sort of 'magnetic-sensitive ether' that continued to rotate after the motor had stopped, meaning that restarting it in the same direction could take advantage of the ether's momentum.
The correct name for the experiment is "hoax" if the experimenter knows his conclusions are wrong or "pseudoscience" if the experimenter believes his conclusions and simply performed a bad experiment.
 
  • #8
DaleSpam said:
The correct name for the experiment is "hoax" if the experimenter knows his conclusions are wrong or "pseudoscience" if the experimenter believes his conclusions and simply performed a bad experiment.

Seriously, not a hoax afaik. I wish i could remember the name. That said if there are any genies reading this, i have other priorties so PM me.
 
  • #9
Anyone?

I have been looking for days now!

I am sure it wasn't a hoax because i found other articles describing the same effect.
 
  • #10
Then it is pseudoscience and they are not carefully controlling their sources of experimental errors. There is no reputable evidence for a luminiferous aether, let alone one that can carry momentum.

Give up this pointless search and apply your time to learning some real science instead. Whether it is a hoax or pseudoscience, either way you are chasing a fairy tale.
 
  • #11
DaleSpam said:
Then it is pseudoscience and they are not carefully controlling their sources of experimental errors. There is no reputable evidence for a luminiferous aether, let alone one that can carry momentum.

Give up this pointless search and apply your time to learning some real science instead. Whether it is a hoax or pseudoscience, either way you are chasing a fairy tale.

Hey, thanks for your response. Congrats on 4000 posts too!

I looked up 'luminiferous aether motor' on google and couldn't find any reference to the experiment i described. Perhaps my explanation is incorrect(!), but i am sure i read a few articles that supported the same result ... 'that a motor restarted before a certain time required less energy to reach full speed'. Aether aside, does this result ring any bells? The energy saving was definitely not down to warm bearings or any other obvious reason.

Also, i was only asking for the name of an experiment. Failing to answer my question, accompanied with a short lecture telling me i need to learn some 'real science', when you know nothing about me (or the experiment i was referring to), kind of makes me think you are prone to missing important information and making rash assumptions.

Cheers.
 

Related to Who knows the proper name for this experiment

1. What is the proper name for this experiment?

The proper name for this experiment is "The Randomized Controlled Trial" or RCT.

2. How do you come up with a proper name for an experiment?

The proper name for an experiment is usually determined by the researcher or team conducting the experiment. It is typically based on the purpose or focus of the experiment. Some common ways to come up with a proper name include using descriptive keywords, referencing the research question, or incorporating the variables being studied.

3. Why is it important to have a proper name for an experiment?

A proper name for an experiment helps to clearly and concisely communicate the purpose and focus of the study. It also allows for easy referencing and organization of research studies in the scientific community. Additionally, a proper name can help to differentiate between similar studies and avoid confusion.

4. Can the proper name for an experiment change?

Yes, the proper name for an experiment can change if the focus or purpose of the study changes. This may occur during the planning or execution of the experiment, or even after the results have been analyzed. It is important to accurately reflect the purpose of the study in the proper name to ensure clear communication and accurate referencing.

5. Are there any guidelines for creating a proper name for an experiment?

There are no strict guidelines for creating a proper name for an experiment. However, it is important to keep the name concise, descriptive, and relevant to the research being conducted. It should also be unique enough to differentiate it from other studies. Some journals or publications may have specific requirements for naming conventions, so it is important to follow those guidelines if applicable.

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