Why did you choose engineering over the sciences?

  1. Did you have a specific interest in engineering or did you want to apply your scientific knowledge to the 'real world'?
    Also I was wondering whether there are people that slightly regret their career path, and why?
    Any info would be helpful!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. berkeman

    Staff: Mentor

    I went to undergrad thinking EE/ME double major, but quickly decided to focus on EE and CS. Then I found my true love, Physics, and did very well at it in addition to enjoying it a lot. So when it came time to declare my major (2 years into the 4 year program), I was torn. In the end, I chose EE over Physics, mostly for economic reasons.

    I haven't regretted the decision, but I try to keep learning more Physics whenever possible, and have thought about going back at some point and earning a BS in Applied Physics. I'll have to semi-retire to do that, though. Still, it's on the list....
     
  4. If you like something there is a library full of it (or internet) you don't always need a degree to prove to people that you can do something. I like engineering because ideally you will apply physical knowledge to improve or design a device. Physists have the tendency to stop short of actually applying there knowledge to do something useful.
     
  5. stewartcs

    stewartcs 2,279
    Science Advisor

    Engineers are more employable than scientists with only undergraduate degrees.

    CS
     
  6. Danger

    Danger 9,879
    Gold Member

    While I have no education in either field, I consider that Engineering is Science. After all, it's the practical application of physics, math, chemistry, and a slough of other disciplines.
    Why I frequent the Engineering forums here more than the others is that I love to tinker about with things, especially in the design area. A real engineer probably shudders in horror at the things that I come up with, but I can usually get the job done one way or another. Hanging out here is the best education that I've ever been exposed to.
     
  7. brewnog

    brewnog 2,793
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Two reasons: a love for creating/making/fixing/breaking things, and the guarantee that the world will always require (and pay for) engineers.
     
  8. what planet do you live on?

    i know plenty of smart engineers with protracted periods of unemployment. i myself have had periods of unemployment or underemployment (with an occasional consulting gig), the last of which stretched from 2003 to 2006. admittedly, i'm a little picky and did not want to work outside of the audio/music_instrument field.

    but i hardly believe in the notion that engineers, even very smart and capable engineers have guaranteed job security. or have very small periods of time between jobs. perhaps some might, but it depends on how much of a slut one is willing to be. if you have a family, kids, a house in a good school district, etc. and don't easily decide to up and move to another state, possibly on the other side of the country, you may not always have a suitable job that exists in your area.
     
  9. PhanthomJay

    PhanthomJay 6,147
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    Come on, out of high school at age 17, who the h--- really knows what they want to do? I chose engineering because I was good at math and the sciences not so good in the humanities. Frankly, I'd rather be climbing a mountain, if I had my choice. Do I regret my career path? Well, the money's decent, but the stress is a killer sometimes. The streams of the mountains please me more.
     
  10. brewnog

    brewnog 2,793
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    A planet where, since qualifying 3 years ago, walked straight into an excellent job in the field I wanted to work in, and have since had four job offers in other areas of industry. A planet where there are 15 companies within a 30 mile radius all desparate for engineers with the skills and qualifications which I have now got. No, careers for engineers are not guaranteed, but there's never going to be a shortage of demand for the skills we have.
     
  11. berkeman

    Staff: Mentor

    I agree with brewnog, but I also think PhantomJay has pointed out something important. I've been in Silicon Valley for the last 25 years or so, because of all the opportunities and basically (almost) continuing demand for EEs. But I really do miss living out in the country, and spending more time there. I spent my high school years out in the country (Calistoga in the Napa Valley), and have very fond memories of those years.

    So yes, IMO if you are strong technically and willing to work hard in school and afterwards, EE affords a pretty good career. You may have to sacrafice a bit on where you live, though, which can be a pain at times. (Like sitting in Friday get-away traffic trying to head out to go camping in the Sierras, for example....)
     
  12. Danger

    Danger 9,879
    Gold Member

    This has always been in the back of my head, but I never really thought about it outside of the long-forgotten 'Stranded on an Island' thread in GD, which was prompted by the TV show 'Lost'.
    An engineer is probably the best survivalist candidate.
     
  13. Pyrrhus

    Pyrrhus 2,276
    Homework Helper

    Yea, that's me too in a nutshell without the mountain climbing part, haha. When i was 17, i just followed my i love math and physics and went into civil engineering. I was very good at the physics classes and for some time thought about changing majors, but in the end i like what i do, and don't have regrets about it.
     
  14. PhanthomJay

    PhanthomJay 6,147
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    Yeah, after 40 years of engineering, I still ask myself what i'd rather do (besides mountain climbing), and I still end up with engineering. Most of the time, it's a real life Dilbert cartoon.
     
  15. russ_watters

    Staff: Mentor

    I tried to think of something profound to say, but that about covers it exactly. Well, that and this:
    The stuff is like wallpaper.
     
  16. russ_watters

    Staff: Mentor

    There are no guarantees in life. But it is a reality that the demand for engineers, in general, outstrips the supply. In your case, it sounds like you picked a highly specialized field. I started off in aerospace engineering, where the problem is similar. Fortunately, I couldn't handle it and switched to mechanical where there are lots more jobs.
     
  17. russ_watters

    Staff: Mentor

    Well yes, that's what my degree says. But I think the question was more about engineering vs pure science. Engineering is applied science (as you clearly understand).
     
  18. russ_watters

    Staff: Mentor

    I've known since roughly age 6.
     
  19. russ_watters

    Staff: Mentor

    One of my favorite books, though I only read it once as an elective in high school (not even sure how I found it - it isn't one of the more read ones) is Jules Verne's "The Mysterious Island":
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Mysterious_Island
    I need to get myself a copy of it, actually - thanks for reminding me. :biggrin:
     
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2008
  20. russ_watters

    Staff: Mentor

    Labor department statistics/info about engineers/engineering: http://stats.bls.gov/oco/ocos027.htm
    There are acutally more aerospace engineers than I realized:
    It also has good info about job growth in specific fields.
     
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2008
  21. Astronuc

    Staff: Mentor

    I would echo what Danger, Brewnog, PhantomJay and Russ mentioned - engineering is applied science. I started off in physics but switched to nuclear engineering, but I still did a lot of physics and still do in my work. In my profession, people "Physics" or "Nuclear Engineering" are just labels, since one does both to some extent.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share a link to this question via email, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook