Why do people insist on using big words they don't know the meaning of ?

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Geographer said:
What's an idiom, Curious?
Are you taking issue with him calling "checkered history" an idiom?

idiom
One entry found for idiom.
Main Entry: id·i·om
Pronunciation: 'i-dE-&m
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle French & Late Latin; Middle French idiome, from Late Latin idioma individual peculiarity of language, from Greek idiOmat-, idiOma, from idiousthai to appropriate, from idios
1 a : the language peculiar to a people or to a district, community, or class : DIALECT b : the syntactical, grammatical, or structural form peculiar to a language
2 : an expression in the usage of a language that is peculiar to itself either grammatically (as no, it wasn't me) or in having a meaning that cannot be derived from the conjoined meanings of its elements (as Monday week for "the Monday a week after next Monday")
3 : a style or form of artistic expression that is characteristic of an individual, a period or movement, or a medium or instrument <the modern jazz idiom>; broadly : MANNER, STYLE <a new culinary idiom>


If so, I too wonder if there isn't a better term for it than "idiom".
 

Chi Meson

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brewnog said:
Why use a big word when a diminutive one will suffice?
"Shouldn't there be a shorter word for 'monosyllabic'?"
 
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zoobyshoe said:
Are you taking issue with him calling "checkered history" an idiom?
...
If so, I too wonder if there isn't a better term for it than "idiom".
I was interested to see what his interpretation of 'idiom' was, not that I was disputing his use of the word, but I didn't really think it fit in that example.

I'm not sure if posting links to sites such as this is allowed here (if so, I'll remove the link), but for those interested in discussing the English language, check out this link:

http://www.apostrophe.fsnet.co.uk/index.htm

It has a message board on there, and although the name is 'Apostrophe Protection Society', they discuss all aspects of English.
 
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Gokul43201

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Hey, ilikeusingbigwords ! :biggrin:
 
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J77 said:
:surprised :surprised :surprised :surprised :surprised

immolate

v : offer as a sacrifice by killing or by giving up to destruction; "The Aztecs immolated human victims"; "immolate the valuables at the temple"

:biggrin:

I think you may mean emulate :)

Immolation is the sincerest form of flattery.

Remember that the next time someone lights you on fire.
 
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Comedian Norm Crosby usd to appear on Johnny Carson alot in the 60's with his fantastic use of malapropisms. I guess he's on the web now:



Dear Mr. Crosby,

Absent knowing how to reach you I am trying this route. I understand you have a date in Boynton at the temple in Dec. Marcia and I would love to see you, break bread, have a drink, or have you stay over with us. My address is (address withheld by Edirot) in Boynton Beach. (phone number withheld by Edirot)

Bob



Dear Bob,

Great to hear from you. Apparently there has been some sort of excommunication here on the InterNest. And I'm glad you brought this to my detention.

You seem to have gotten my e-mail address off some website called Shtick! where they have a column that claims to be written by Yours Trudy. Actually, I've read the fake Ask Norm Crosby column and I wish I had found this Charlie Recksieck guy back when I was looking for writers for "Norm Crosby's Comedy Shop." We had so many so-called comedy writers for that show come in and out of there, we should have installed a revolting door.

So as it turns out, Bob, when you sent the e-mail to Norm Crosby, you're actually reaching some guy named Charlie with your e-mail. It's not me, just an incredible stimulation. I don't bear this importer any ill will -- you know what they say, "Intonation is the sincerest form of battery."

Yes, I do have a show at the Temple in December. Please come up and say "Hello." I'm touched by your offer to stay with you, though I already do have complications arranged at the Mariott. But I would love to say hi to you and Marcia.

Take care,

Norm Crosby
http://www.shtick.org/NormCrosby/norm36.htm [Broken]
 
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Hurkyl

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honestrosewater said:
Have you seen this list yet? I think you might enjoy it. It might even become a tradition.
I haven't seen that one. Nice. :smile: Until now, I've only seen this list of Simpsons neologisms.
 

Curious3141

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Geographer said:
I was interested to see what his interpretation of 'idiom' was, not that I was disputing his use of the word, but I didn't really think it fit in that example.

I'm not sure if posting links to sites such as this is allowed here (if so, I'll remove the link), but for those interested in discussing the English language, check out this link:

http://www.apostrophe.fsnet.co.uk/index.htm

It has a message board on there, and although the name is 'Apostrophe Protection Society', they discuss all aspects of English.
Hmm...

Well, 'idiom', like so many other words, has various shades of meaning. I suppose there are 2 broad "categories" for the meaning - the first being a peculiar parlance or patois native to some people, and the second being a turn of phrase with a meaning that is not derivable from its literal construction. I was using the latter meaning.
 
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Tom Mattson

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If you enjoy funny misuses of big words then watch any episode of The Sopranos in which Little Carmine Lupertazzi is featured.

Hurkyl said:
The cromulent use of big words embiggens the smallest man.
:biggrin: Jebediah Springfield!
 

Lisa!

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Curious3141 said:
"Checkered history" ?! Does this guy even know what that idiom means ? :rolleyes:
Halazoon!!!
 
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Curious3141 said:
This is a big, big pet peeve of mine. I just got this email inviting me to a BioMechanics conference. Here's a snippet :



"Checkered history" ?! Does this guy even know what that idiom means ?:rolleyes:

I'm sure he meant "glorious" or "distinguished", but ended up giving us all the impression that the conference has previously been embroiled in controversy and shady happenings.

See what happens when you try to convince others you're smarter than you are ? You just end up looking like a great, big fool. :rofl:
Yes I wish people would stop making a shamokery of the english language. It's not a stupendiferous as they make it out to be :biggrin:
 

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