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Why doesn't Rubidium decay to Strontium?

  1. May 15, 2015 #1
    Both ##^{87}_{37}Rb## and ##^{87}_{38}Sr## are odd-even nuclei, so we can ignore the pairing term ##\delta##. I tried to calculate the most stable Z for a given A by finding ##\frac{\partial B}{\partial Z} = 0##. That gives the most Z-stable value of ##Z_0 = \frac{2\gamma A}{4\gamma + \epsilon A^{\frac{2}{3}}}## which is ##38## for ##A=87##.
    image.png

    If that's the case, then why wouldn't Rb beta decay to Strontium as these are naturally occurring isobars.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 15, 2015 #2

    jtbell

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    87Rb does, in fact, beta-decay with a half-life of about 4.8 x 1010 years. See e.g. http://www.nndc.bnl.gov/chart/
     
  4. May 15, 2015 #3
    Then why is it so stable with such a long half-life?
     
  5. May 15, 2015 #4

    Vanadium 50

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    What do you think it's half life should be?
     
  6. May 15, 2015 #5
    My question is since it is more stable to undergo beta decay, why doesn't it undergo decay quicker? For example uranium 235's half life is 10 times shorter.
     
  7. May 15, 2015 #6

    Vanadium 50

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    And Vanadium-50's is a million times longer. What do you think it's half life should be?
     
  8. May 16, 2015 #7
    I get your point.
     
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