Why Gamma Ray Emission Has No Change in A or Z?

In summary, when an atom undergoes gamma ray emission, there is no change in its mass or atomic number, unlike in alpha and beta decay. This is because the nucleus is left in an excited state and releases energy in the form of photons without changing its constituents. This is in accordance with conservation laws and has been confirmed by various sources.
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Why in gamma ray emission there is no change in A or Z ?

We know that in Alpha decay 2 protons and 2 neutrons are subtracted from the element. and in Beta decay there is change in atomic number by + or - 1. but why there is no any change in Gamma Decay in mass number A or atomic number.

i have asked this question to several forums but did not get a satisfactory reply..

Zayed Waqas
 
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  • #2
abrowaqas said:
Why in gamma ray emission there is no change in A or Z ?

We know that in Alpha decay 2 protons and 2 neutrons are subtracted from the element. and in Beta decay there is change in atomic number by + or - 1. but why there is no any change in Gamma Decay in mass number A or atomic number.

i have asked this question to several forums but did not get a satisfactory reply..

Zayed Waqas

When an excited atom makes a transition to a lower level, it releases energy in the form of photons, but it doesn't change any of its identity. A nucleus also has a similar energy level. In certainly nuclear decay, the nucleus can be left in an excited state, where by a gamma ray is emitted when it drops to a lower energy state. In such a case, there is no change in its constituents, and there's no need for it simply via conservation laws.

See

http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&sour...UXpX53-Qg&sig2=CMcZsqT787lyBC2_XilhQA&cad=rja

Zz.
 

1. Why is gamma ray emission independent of the atomic number (Z) and mass number (A)?

Gamma ray emission is a result of the rearrangement of energy levels within the nucleus of an atom. This rearrangement does not depend on the number of protons or neutrons in the nucleus, but rather on the energy difference between the initial and final energy states. Therefore, gamma ray emission is independent of A and Z.

2. How does the stability of an atom affect the likelihood of gamma ray emission?

The stability of an atom is determined by the balance between the attractive nuclear force and the repulsive electrostatic force between protons. A stable atom has a lower energy state and therefore, a lower likelihood of gamma ray emission. However, even stable atoms can undergo gamma ray emission if they transition to a lower energy state.

3. Can gamma ray emission change the identity of an element?

No, gamma ray emission does not change the number of protons in the nucleus, which is the defining characteristic of an element. Therefore, the element's identity remains unchanged even after gamma ray emission.

4. Are there any factors that can affect the rate of gamma ray emission?

The rate of gamma ray emission is primarily determined by the energy difference between the initial and final energy states of the nucleus. Other factors, such as temperature and external forces, can also affect the rate of emission but to a much lesser extent.

5. How does gamma ray emission compare to other forms of radiation in terms of energy and penetration?

Gamma rays have the highest energy and penetration capability among the three types of radiation (alpha, beta, and gamma). They can travel long distances and penetrate through many materials, making them useful in medical imaging and cancer treatment. However, this high energy also makes them potentially dangerous to living organisms.

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