Why myeloid-erythroid ration is 4:1 while more RBC's in blood?

  • Thread starter tarekatpf
  • Start date
  • Tags
    Blood
In summary, the normal ratio of myeloid and erythroid cells in the bone marrow is 4:1. However, in the circulation, there are almost 1000 times more red blood cells (RBCs) than total white blood cells (WBCs), which includes non-myeloid cells. This may be due to the fact that erythrocytes have a longer lifespan than leukocytes. Additionally, the bone marrow may hold a reserve of myelopoietic cells for emergencies, potentially contributing to the perceived imbalance in cell ratios.
  • #1
140
1
In the bone marrow, the normal ratio of myeloid and erythroid series cells is 4:1. So, for every erythroid cell, there are four myeloid cells, which gives
But in the circulation, there are almost 1000 times more RBC's than total WBC's ( which also includes non-myeloid WBC's, such as lymphocytes. )

Why is it so?
 
Biology news on Phys.org
  • #2
tarekatpf said:
In the bone marrow, the normal ratio of myeloid and erythroid series cells is 4:1. So, for every erythroid cell, there are four myeloid cells, which gives
But in the circulation, there are almost 1000 times more RBC's than total WBC's ( which also includes non-myeloid WBC's, such as lymphocytes. )

Why is it so?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bone_marrow

I'm not sure it is so. Myelopoietic cells constitute 56.6% of parenchymal cells while erythropoietic cells constitute 25.6% of such cells. Erythrocytes circulate for about 120 days while leukocytes circulate for about 3-4 days. This may explain part of the perceived imbalance. No teleologic explanation is required for the rest of the perceived imbalance, but it might be that the bone marrow holds a reserve of myelopoietic cells for emergencies.

EDIT: Allowing for the possibility of an error in my addition, it's still clear the ratio is closer to 2:1.
 
Last edited:

1. Why is the myeloid-erythroid ratio 4:1 in the blood?

The myeloid-erythroid ratio in the blood refers to the proportion of myeloid cells (white blood cells) to erythroid cells (red blood cells). This ratio is typically around 4:1, meaning that there are about four times as many myeloid cells as erythroid cells in the blood. This is due to the fact that myeloid cells are responsible for defending against infections and other foreign invaders, while erythroid cells are responsible for carrying oxygen to the body's tissues.

2. What factors contribute to the 4:1 myeloid-erythroid ratio in the blood?

The myeloid-erythroid ratio in the blood is influenced by a number of factors. One major factor is the body's demand for oxygen, which determines the number of erythroid cells needed to carry oxygen to the tissues. Additionally, the presence of infections or inflammation can lead to an increase in myeloid cells, as they are responsible for fighting off these threats.

3. Is a myeloid-erythroid ratio of 4:1 considered normal?

Yes, a myeloid-erythroid ratio of 4:1 is considered normal. However, this ratio can vary slightly depending on factors such as age and overall health. In some cases, such as during certain infections or bone marrow disorders, the ratio may be significantly altered.

4. Can the myeloid-erythroid ratio change over time?

Yes, the myeloid-erythroid ratio can change over time. As the body's demand for oxygen fluctuates or in response to infections or other health conditions, the ratio may shift. Additionally, changes in the bone marrow, which produces blood cells, can also affect the myeloid-erythroid ratio.

5. How is the myeloid-erythroid ratio measured?

The myeloid-erythroid ratio is typically measured through a complete blood count (CBC) test. This test provides information on the number and types of blood cells present in a sample of blood, including myeloid and erythroid cells. The ratio is then calculated based on the number of each type of cell present.

Suggested for: Why myeloid-erythroid ration is 4:1 while more RBC's in blood?

Replies
5
Views
1K
Replies
10
Views
1K
Replies
4
Views
2K
Replies
7
Views
1K
Replies
3
Views
853
Back
Top