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Worst highschool teacher you ever had!

  1. Feb 22, 2010 #1
    Just wondering what some of you guys experienced going through highschool... I think it should be a pretty funny thread.

    My worst highschool teacher had to have been my Kinesiology teacher.

    For our first 'big' assignment we had to make a joint of our choice. So me and my buddy picked the radial-ulnar joint in your forearm. For the assignment we had to include any ligaments, tendons, muscles, cartiledge and of course the bones that were involved in the movement of the joint.

    On the assignment sheet it said that you needed to fully label the muscles, tendons and ligaments. We had to use full scientific names etc. this was PRETTY difficult considering the sheer amount of muscles and ligaments that go through your forearm and it took a pretty long time for us to find a diagram which labelled everything we needed.

    We decided to use pure white clay for the bones, cristco for the cartiledge, felt for the muscles, and piple cleaners for the ligaments/tendons. We molded the bones by hand and baked them so they were solid and we drilled a few holes in various areas and put metal wire through it to hold the ends of the bones in place. (I had broke one of the bones TWICE but we patched it up pretty nicely... the cool thing is that it actually looked like real bones.)

    To make a long completed the assignment and handed it in. I must say we were expecting no lower than 95% on it... it was BEAUTIFUL. You could have seen it on display in a museum or a display on anatomy etc.

    We got back the marking scheme and were quite disappointed by our mark... we got like a 60%... So we went through the marks.
    Under the 'movement' mark category we got perfect. The teacher left a comment for us... so we read it. It said something along the lines of:
    EXCELLENT MOVEMENT GUYS REALLY WELL DONE! FANTASTIC BONES! REALLY LIFELIKE!
    We were pretty happy with that comment but couldn't see where we went wrong.... until we got to the 'bones' category.
    We got 0 out of 10 on the bones category... This was the second heaviest mark category in the assignment next to movement.

    Apparently we were supposed to label the bones as well, and even though we protested to here that the assignment only specifically asked for labels on the ligaments, tendons and muscles she wouldn't change the mark on account that she would have to change other peoples marks or it wouldn't be fair.

    This TOTALLY made me lose interest in that class, I stopped attending and when I did go I just sat and made fun of the dumb things she was saying and talking to the pretty girls that sat in front of me :wink:.

    It wasn't just because of this mark that she was my worst teacher... she actually wasn't that bright (she was actually a gym teacher)... she understood a lot about working out though but that was no use in this class.

    As well I actually helped people out in the class to improve their own marks but couldn't be bothered to waste my time on my work to get a grade. So I think I understood the material perfectly. She just really killed it for it me. lol.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 22, 2010 #2
    i'd say my american history teacher. 5 days a week, we'd show up. she'd read her notes to us, and we'd write down what she said for nearly an hour. this went on for 9 months. i hated that class.

    i didn't have a decent american history course until i filled my core curriculum requirement at university. i did this on a miniterm, which meant that for about 3 weeks, all i did was go spend 3+ hours in class, then go home and read for the rest of the day. it was hell, but the focus was on politics and why things happen, and not on memorizing dates.
     
  4. Feb 22, 2010 #3
    Wow. I wonder how some teachers complain about their jobs...
     
  5. Feb 22, 2010 #4
    I forgot everything about high school the moment I graduated from there; there are good teachers and bad teachers. After some time, all teachers turn out to be good because one who were bad give you *more valuable* life experiences that good teacher did not give.

    We had a teacher in the first year who would give the hardest quizzes and went out of curriculum to do that. Most people hate him during the class but after about a year most started to appreciate him.
     
  6. Feb 22, 2010 #5

    S_Happens

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    I had a couple of winners, but I'll pick one based on the fact that the teacher was able to make classtime completely worthless. I had a handful that were mean, disrespectful people, but at least their class wasn't a total waste of time.

    It was an American history class. The teacher was a coach at the school (I don't even remember what he coached, maybe track). The entire year was a two day repetitive cycle. The first day he'd sit in front of the class and read directly from the textbook. The second day he'd finish reading and then we'd take a small quiz over that material.

    He added nothing outside of the textbook to the class. He had no interaction with the class for the entire year. The only thing he actually did was make students stand up if they were caught sleeping, and believe me, everyone was sleeping. I learned to sleep with my head propped up on my hand, perfectly balanced.

    The only interesting thing that happened all year was when I was sleeping one time. The teacher was deep off into his reading and the entire class was on autopilot for the next 30 minutes. I had my feet on the basket of the desk in front of me. I must have had one of those dreams where you get something thrown at you or something surprises you, because it caused me to react. My body flexed, and my desk must have slid back almost a foot. The heavy desk on tile floor made for a very loud screech, and scared crap out of everyone in the room. I saw the looks on their faces and when my buddy told me I had almost given him a heart attack I started laughing and couldn't stop. The teacher, in his blatant ignorance of the situation, started laughing and asked if I was ok. I guess he didn't realize I was sleeping because I didn't have to stand up.

    That was all I can remember about that class.

    I had another teacher that despised me for some reason (there were certainly more disruptive/disrespectful students that myself in there), until he found out that I played soccer outside of school. He was the school's soccer coach, and in one simple moment I went from being almost hated to adored.
     
  7. Feb 22, 2010 #6
    Chi Meson. God I hated his class. :wink:

    But, I've been out of HS for almost 8 years now. Holy cow, time flies!
     
  8. Feb 22, 2010 #7
    I had a math teacher that did that. He failed 27 out of 30 students(in a magnet school) and was constantly on probation for failing too many kids. He ended up getting fired, but that didn't help the fact that being in his class destroyed my confidence, and contributed to my depression. I still don't understand how he was hired in the first place...
     
  9. Feb 22, 2010 #8
    I had a class in flash animation one year, which I didn't want to take in the first place but due to some weird policy we had to pick a half credit class to fill our schedule and this was the only one that seemed moderately interesting to me. It was intended to be a time waster basically to keep everyone in the school from having a study hall or something.

    So the class was broken down into 3 projects. The first one i did a mediocre job, got like an 85% or something but I wanted a better grade. The second one was we had to make an educational game. I started getting really into my game, which was like a math blaster type game, because I wanted a better grade in this super easy class than I got for the first project. As it went on, I got super involved in this project, learned tons about flash that went miles above anything we were expected to learn in this class. There was not a single ounce of scripting taught in this class, but I went completely out of my way to figure out how to do tons of scripting, just did hours and hours of reading about flash on the internet. I got hung up tons of times and my teacher was no help because he couldn't even understand what I was trying to do in the slightest.

    Long story short, I finally got my all my code working the way I want and was so proud of the way I made all of it work, completely on the merit of my own research, and perseverance. I was on top of the world. It hands down went miles and miles above anything anyone else in the class could possibly, ever have attempted to do. I get my grade back and it's a 70%. I just about exploded. Turns out the grading scheme was 50% aesthetics (can't remember exactly what he called it), and 50% gameplay, originality, and how educational it was. I lost 30% because on one of the main levels of my game I used like a yellow text on green background or something stupid like that.

    I was just completely in shock. Everyone else turned in a game which took 5 hours to make, I turned in a game that took 100 hours to make. And he had the balls to give me a 70%! I could have changed the color with 2 clicks! And since the guy knew nothing about programming besides the most basic of basic flash techniques, he flat out didn't believe me about the work I had put in. He thought I was being a jerk because I was mad about my grade!

    Next project, I was completely and utterly apathetic about. I did the absolute minimum possible work that could possibly satisfy the assignment. Got something like a 90%.
     
  10. Feb 22, 2010 #9

    Pyrrhus

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    My physics teacher didn't know crap. He will just regurgitate formulas and apply them to problems. I remember when I started college, I had the idea that physics was just a bunch of variables put together in formulas without any fundamental logic behind them. Similar to the equations you get from a dimensional analysis perspective. It is sound dimensionally, but where is the science?.

    In college, I had the best physics professors. A funny serbian guy with a real passion for physics. I thank the guy a lot! for his inspiration and his book recommendations. I learned a lot from this fellow. I still keep contact with this professor. I have him in Facebook.
     
  11. Feb 22, 2010 #10
    Your teacher is a lowlife moron.
     
  12. Feb 22, 2010 #11

    Chi Meson

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    I remember my first Spanish teacher.

    She was one of those "us vs. them" people. Everything seemed to be a "gotcha!" moment. If a word on a quiz was missing an accent, it was wrong, 10 points off. IF a sentence contained any error at all, masculine vs feminine, tense, mood, conjugation, whatever, the whole thing was wrong, no matter how much in it was correct.

    As was said, she turned out to be a good life lesson, because I think of her a lot when I consider how NOT to be a teacher. My grading scheme is not to start at 100 and subtract points; rather, I start at zero and add points for everything that is done properly.
     
  13. Feb 22, 2010 #12
    Pretty much every English class was a nightmare for me.
     
  14. Feb 22, 2010 #13

    Ben Niehoff

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    Hmm...all my worst teachers were from my senior year (I attended a different school my senior year, in a different state, and practically every teacher there was horrible).

    My AP Spanish teacher was from Columbia and she was crazy. She treated us like children, and never taught anything I didn't already know.

    My AP Computer Science teacher was ok at programming, but didn't teach the correct material because he was too proud to "teach to the test". But there is a difference between "teaching to the test", and "teaching material that relates to actual computer science and might be relevant to the test", which he didn't do either. He did have us write programs, and at least he was impressed when mine ran super-fast (I had one that could factor numbers up to ~4 billion into prime factors nearly instantaneously on Pentium III's; he said his previous record was 6 seconds).

    My AP Physics teacher was probably the worst. He didn't care whether we learned anything or not; he just assigned projects to keep us busy. The projects themselves were fun, but I had to teach myself physics. The few times he lectured, he sometimes told us outright lies. For example, he claimed that the Parallel Axis Theorem only applied when the mass points were discrete, and didn't work for extended objects. I drew up a proof to the contrary using calculus; he didn't care.

    Most teachers at my senior year highschool had serious authority issues--meaning that, they felt very threatened by any student that might outdo them. It seemed the most important thing about the classroom to them was keeping absolute control over the students for an hour, and any education that happened was incidental to that. This highschool also had a rule banning facial hair on male students, and I think the primary reason was so that these teachers would not be threatened by the idea that they were teaching young adults, not children.

    By contrast, I had several awesome teachers at my first highschool, before senior year. My AP Calculus teacher was a riot. As was my AP Chemistry teacher...think Bill Nye, only older and grey.

    I had a teacher for two history classes (modern European, and Medieval) who gave the hardest exams I have ever taken. One of our exams literally consisted of the words "Otto von Bismarck" at the top of the page, followed by 2-3 blank sheets of paper. We then had to write everything there was to know about Otto von Bismarck, and if we missed any event, date, or fact about Otto von Bismarck that he had ever told us, he would deduct points. Also, he would lecture from memory without notes. He was also a really great guy, though, and his class is one of my favorites.
     
  15. Feb 22, 2010 #14
    I had a few different teachers that were bad. None of there were absolutely terrible though. One loved to harass students for any reason she could find. She would make fun of your clothes if she couldn't find anything actually related to school work. Supposedly (from what other students said) she aimed each semester to send at least one student crying from her class room. In my class she took shots at me for everything from my clothing to not having my homework until she realized that I was acing all of her tests and none of her belittling bothered me in the slightest.
     
  16. Feb 22, 2010 #15
    Wow lots of great stories :smile:... Even Chi had something to say about one of his highschool teachers :tongue:. I figured he'd be in here defending them! haha.

    I can see American History teachers seem to not be the greatest... maybe it's because the course is boring anyways? I don't know I'm from Canada and my school didn't offer this course.

    One teacher who I had that I loved was a humanities teacher. He was that teacher of the school who everyone said was the smartest and most tough teacher and to avoid his courses at any cost. So naturally I signed up first to take his courses :smile:.

    First had him in Grade 11 for an ancient history course. He had a PhD in history, was an 'ex-professor' and archaeologist so this was his 'calling' so to speak. I learnt a lot during this class. One of the greatest things I remember about this class was an 'assignment' he gave to us as a class. Our independant culminating unit was an essay on a topic of our choosing relating to ancient history. (mine was on the Crusades specifically the first crusade) We were given the entire semester to do our research and work on this essay, it was set up in stages that you were required to submit so that the teacher could make sure you were on the right track. This process alone taught me a lot about researching and writing an essay.

    Anyways one day we were in a computer lab and he told us to go onto wikipedia and to look up our topics on wikipedia. He then told us to change everything on wikipedia and make sure we gave it sources and stuff but the information wasn't factual. So we did this... the information wasn't corrected for quite a while for some of the topics... our school got banned from being able to edit things on wikipedia, I'm sure this ban is still in effect (this happend like 4 years ago haha). He made us do this to show why wikipedia isn't a useful source for researching a topic and wasn't being accept as a source. (we could only use primary/secondary sources preferrably primary).

    Next I had him twice in Philosophy. This was BY FAR the most difficult course I had ever taken. The readings were bizarre to me at the time as I had no background in philosophical readings. The class was fun though... the tests were brutal and the assignments were few.

    The tests consisted of an essay question where you had to defend/alter/reject a statment which he gave... sounds easy but it's not when you only have just under 2 hours. The first time the essay question was simple: Why? He then gave you exactly 6 sheets of blank paper and you proceeded to write an essay answering the question. I wrote 'Why not.' followed by two pages showing why not was acceptable and I handed it in first. I got a 90% on the essay since I made a few spelling and grammar mistakes.
    A reason why this course was so different was because the amount of assignments was so low. We got I believe 3 assignments 4 unit tests a culminating unit and the exam which was 2 parts. He told us that he constructed the course this way to better prepare us for university since the individual assignments carried more weight. However if you did HORRIBLY bad on an assignment but were able to prove to him that you were better (in subsequent assignments/test) then he would drop your bad mark.

    A lot of his method was all about preparing you for university which the other teachers paid no attention at all to. One time on an Economics course he used a 'correctional factor' so people wouldn't guess answers.... the highest mark on the test was 30%. Many people had -%... I'm really thankful for having taken his class though... it was tough and required lots of work but I feel like it's truly prepared me for university. As well he was always there for you no matter what was up. He one time proof read an English essay for me... and one time let me borrow books from his personal library at his home lol...
     
  17. Feb 22, 2010 #16
    I had a Russian teacher I was stuck with for 3 years who made me want to jump off the deep end. Most of the class were native Russian speakers (who she loved because they had good pronunciation) and kids with Russian parents (who she disliked 'cause she thought we were taking it for an easy grade). She showed tons of favoritism towards the non-Russian kids, and gave them high grades even though they didn't know anything. But besides the personality, she spent maybe two weeks actually teaching: one week on letters and another week on verb conjugation,tenses, and subject verb agreement. Mind, Russian grammar is crazy difficult, but she then started giving random grammer quizzes the following week.

    The rest of the three years were mostly spent on her telling us about her family, random movies and projects, and assorted reading assignments where she'd mark down if the student disagreed with her interpretation of the book. I wanted to throw something at her when I got marked down for an art project cause she didn't like my style, but she gave lots of points to the kids who basically cut and pasted a bunch of things onto an oaktag. I think the only reason I even managed to pass the regents was 'cause I already somewhat knew the language.

    Mine rocked. Was a little pretentious about having a phD, but otherwise quite awesome. He was one of the few teachers I've ever had that encouraged us to write really short, clean essays. He had a 17 sentence rule to keeping filler down (3 sentence intro, 4/5 each body paragraph, conclusion) so that we'd be able to knock 'em out on the AP exam.
     
  18. Feb 23, 2010 #17
    Easy. My freshman Math teacher. I struggled so hard to understand what he was teaching and got nowhere. It seemed like the ramblings of a drunken bum. I complained to my family about it and my older brother said he had the same teacher with the same problem. He asked me if he went to the supply closet more than the other teachers. Yes. Well it turns out he was drinking on the job. My brother taught me algebra and I had no trouble with algebra II in my junior year and calculus in my senior year.
     
  19. Feb 23, 2010 #18

    Borek

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    Wow, no upper limit to the grade?
     
  20. Feb 23, 2010 #19

    Ivan Seeking

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    The worst teacher? When I thought about this, I realized this is a somewhat funny question. I ended up in an LA public high school that was full of gangbangers and drug dealers. Most carried weapons. I remember one guy that actually carried a brief case full of pcp on campus. Every day, the walk to school was terrifying. If one happened upon the wrong gang, anything was possible; assault, theft, or even murder. Some gangs required that new members kill as a part of the initiation. Two of my best friends had already been attacked by gangs while on their way to school, so I figured it was just a matter of time.

    So, I pretty much stopped going to school and started drinking a half pint of 151 for lunch, every day. After missing over 40 days in one semester, only one teacher noticed - my geometry teacher. He took the time to call my mother at work and ask if she knew how many days I had missed. Soon after that we left the Los Angeles area.

    I passed all of my classes.
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2010
  21. Feb 23, 2010 #20
    I didn't realize that schools could be this dangerous until my brother started high school. He was failing all his classes because he wasn't going to school. My parents flipped out. He told them about the gangs and all the violence he saw every day that was unavoidable. The next semester he went to the school my sister and I went to, and started doing well. He made friends, participated in extracurricular activities, and enjoyed at least some of his classes, and he didn't have to bring a knife with him. He was too busy trying not to get jumped in the old school to do any of those things. How some kids come through these schools with any education is a wonder to me.
     
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