2D-cross-double-slit experiments for understanding quantum world

In summary, the conversation discusses the double-slit experiment in quantum mechanics and the difficulty in interpreting the results when performed with a single photon. The concept of self-interference is explained, and it is noted that using a laser to illuminate the slits does not demonstrate quantum mechanical interference. The conversation ends with the thread being closed, but can be reopened if needed.
  • #1
davidpeng1749
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The regular double-slit experiment is the "the basic Mystery" in quantum (Feynman).
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now I have done several cross-double-slit experiments with different configurations,
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My question is: how photons “sense”: (1) which slit they pass through; (2) what photons they will interferewith, then to create interference pattern accordingly. When the experiments are performed with single photon, it is much hard to interpret.

for more observation of experiments, please see:
Observations of Cross-Double-Slit Experiments by Hui Peng
International Journal of Physics. 2020, 8(2), 39-41. DOI: 10.12691/ijp-8-2-1
 

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  • #2
There's a basic misunderstanding here.

Quantum mechanical interference is self-interference, the phenomenon that we observe when a single photon at a time is sent towards the slits and the various paths it might take interfere with one another to affect the probability of the photon being detected at various points on the screen. Each individual photon is detected at a single point on the screen (for example, makes a dot on a piece of photographic film) and the interference pattern only appears after many of these single-photon detections when more dots have appeared in some areas and fewer in others.

Using a laser to illuminate the slits does not demonstrate quantum mechanical interference. As with Young's experiment early in the 19th century, we're observing only the classical interference of electromagnetic waves.

This thread is closed.
(As with all thread closings, it can be reopened on request if there is more to say on the subject)
 
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Related to 2D-cross-double-slit experiments for understanding quantum world

1. What is a 2D-cross-double-slit experiment?

A 2D-cross-double-slit experiment is a type of experiment used in quantum mechanics to study the behavior of particles, such as electrons, in a two-dimensional space. It involves passing a beam of particles through two narrow slits and observing the resulting interference pattern on a detector screen.

2. How does a 2D-cross-double-slit experiment help us understand the quantum world?

This experiment helps us understand the quantum world by demonstrating the wave-particle duality of particles. The interference pattern observed on the detector screen shows that particles can behave like waves, which is a fundamental concept in quantum mechanics.

3. What are the key components of a 2D-cross-double-slit experiment?

The key components of a 2D-cross-double-slit experiment include a beam of particles, two narrow slits, a detector screen, and a source of light or other energy to illuminate the particles. The experiment also requires precise measurement tools and control of external factors such as temperature and vibration.

4. What are some applications of 2D-cross-double-slit experiments?

2D-cross-double-slit experiments have various applications in quantum mechanics, such as testing the principles of wave-particle duality and studying the behavior of particles in different environments. They are also used in the development of quantum technologies, such as quantum computing and quantum cryptography.

5. Are there any limitations to 2D-cross-double-slit experiments?

Yes, there are limitations to 2D-cross-double-slit experiments. The experiment can only be performed on particles with a small mass, such as electrons, and in a controlled environment. Additionally, the Heisenberg uncertainty principle states that the more precisely we measure the position of a particle, the less precisely we can measure its momentum, making it difficult to fully understand the behavior of particles in this experiment.

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