50 88lbs Plasma TV mount on Stand - Free Body Diagram

In summary, the conversation discusses the design of a customized stand for a plasma TV. The base of the stand is made of 2-inch square iron tubes and is in an "H" shape with a center pole rising 4 feet tall. The TV will be mounted with screws on two horizontal square tubes that are welded to the center pole. The conversation also mentions the forces and torques that need to be considered to prevent the TV from tilting or coming loose due to its own weight. However, there is a lack of specific details and dimensions provided for a proper analysis of the design.
  • #1
plasmatv
1
0
50" 88lbs Plasma TV mount on Stand - Free Body Diagram

Hi,

I am building a customized stand for my palsma tv. I already have the base, made of 2" square iron tubes. I am about to design the mount for the screws, but I was wondering what forces should I consider for this.

The base is in an "H" shape with a center pole rising about 4 feet tall (the whole structure of the stand is welded). The TV will be mounted with screws in two horizontal square tubes. These two horizontal tubes will be welded to the center pole, so the forces will be acting downward to the middle of the "H" base. The base has four wheels for easy displacement. The wheels have breaks.

What forces or torques should I consider to avoid the tv to tilt forward or brake loose from the screws because of the tv's own weight or creep? I took this in college a long time ago, so I'm familiar with the terms, but I can't remember the process to analyze this.

Thank you!

PS: Sorry for the quality of the sketch! :P
 

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  • #2
plasmatv: You say the base is made of 2 inch square tubes, but your diagram says 1 x 2 inch rectangular tubes (and does not designate the cross section orientation for each member). You give no wall thickness of the tubes. You give no dimensions in your diagram, and no detailed views showing how the welded connections are made. You say the tubes are iron. Are they really iron? Or are they regular mild steel tubes, which are more common? Do you have a material specification for the material of your tubes? You do not give the horizontal offset dimensions from the TV center of gravity to your tubes. You only state the mast height (presumably from tip to tip), but you do not give the location of the welded connections. You give no locations nor details of the bolted connections, nor the bolt size and material grade. How is the connection of the mast to the H reinforced? Does this connection have triangular stiffener (gusset) plates? Do the upper horizontal tubes (or any other joints) have gusset plates? Can you provide the above information and dimensioned diagrams or dimensioned sketches?
 
  • #3


Hello,

Thank you for sharing your project with me. I can provide some insight into the forces and torques that you should consider when designing your plasma TV mount on stand.

Firstly, it is important to consider the weight of the TV itself, which is 88lbs. This will be the main downward force acting on the mount. In addition, you should also consider the weight of any additional equipment or accessories that may be attached to the TV, as this will add to the overall weight.

Next, you should consider the forces acting on the mount from the wheels. As the TV is being moved, there will be a force acting in the direction of the movement, which could potentially cause the TV to tilt forward if not properly secured. The wheels also have brakes, which will add an additional force in the opposite direction when activated. Both of these forces should be taken into account when designing the mount.

In terms of torque, you should consider the weight distribution of the TV and the mount itself. If the center of mass of the TV is not directly above the center of the mount, this could create a torque that could cause the TV to tilt or become unstable. Additionally, any movements or vibrations from the TV or the stand could also create torque and potentially cause the TV to tilt.

To analyze these forces and torques, you can use the principles of statics and mechanics. This involves breaking down the forces acting on the system, calculating the moments and torques, and ensuring that the system is in equilibrium. This will help you determine the necessary strength and stability of the mount to support the weight of the TV and withstand any external forces.

I hope this information helps you in designing a safe and sturdy mount for your plasma TV. Best of luck with your project!
 

Related to 50 88lbs Plasma TV mount on Stand - Free Body Diagram

What is a free body diagram?

A free body diagram is a visual representation of the forces acting on an object. It is commonly used in physics and engineering to analyze the motion of objects and determine the net force acting on them.

What is the weight of a 50" 88lbs Plasma TV?

The weight of a 50" 88lbs Plasma TV is 88 pounds. This information can be found on the product specifications or by using a scale to measure the weight of the TV.

What is the purpose of a TV mount on a stand?

A TV mount on a stand is used to securely hold and display a TV. It not only provides a stable base for the TV, but also allows for adjustable height and viewing angles for optimal viewing experience.

How do I determine the forces acting on the TV mount?

To determine the forces acting on the TV mount, a free body diagram can be used. The weight of the TV and the mount itself will be acting downwards, while the reaction force from the ground and any other external forces (such as wind) will be acting upwards.

What are the important factors to consider when choosing a TV mount for a 50" 88lbs Plasma TV?

The important factors to consider when choosing a TV mount for a 50" 88lbs Plasma TV include the weight capacity of the mount, the size and compatibility with the TV, and the type of mount (e.g. fixed, tilt, full motion). It is also important to consider the stability and durability of the mount to ensure the safety of the TV and those around it.

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