A bullet and a block (Momentum)

In summary, a 7.00 g bullet was fired horizontally into a 1.29 kg wooden block resting on a horizontal surface. The coefficient of kinetic friction between the block and surface was 0.180. The bullet remained embedded in the block and caused it to slide a distance of 0.230 m before coming to a stop. The initial speed of the bullet can be calculated using the conservation of energy and momentum equations. It was determined to be approximately 166.9 m/s, which may seem slow for a bullet, but the short distance of 23 cm for the block to slide may explain this.
  • #1
Chandasouk
165
0
A bullet of mass 7.00 g is fired horizontally into a wooden block of mass 1.29 kg resting on a horizontal surface. The coefficient of kinetic friction between block and surface is 0.180. The bullet remains embedded in the block, which is observed to slide a distance 0.230 m along the surface before stopping.

What was the initial speed of the bullet?



Okay, first off, I know the block is sliding after the collision so that is internal energy.

[tex]\Delta[/tex]Uinternal = Friction Force* Distance

=(12.7106N)(.180)(.230m) = 0.52621884J

From here, i do not know what to do.

Here was what I attempted:

KE=[tex]\Delta[/tex]Uinternal

so

.5(1.297kg)v^2 = 0.52621884J

Velocity of the block was 0.9007m/s

Then I used Conservation of Momentum

Pi = Pf

.007kgV = (1.297kg)(.9007m/s)

V=166.9m/s


I don't know, seems slow for a bullet.
 
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  • #2
Yes, it seems slow for a bullet, but then 23 cm doesn't seem very far for the block to slide. Your approach looks correct to me.
 
  • #3


Your calculation is correct. The initial speed of the bullet was 166.9 m/s. This may seem slow for a bullet, but it is important to remember that the bullet was embedded in the block and therefore, the mass of the system increased significantly. This decrease in velocity is also due to the friction force acting on the block, which decreases the overall momentum of the system. It is also possible that the bullet was not fired at its maximum speed, or that there were other factors at play that affected its velocity. Nonetheless, your calculations are accurate and provide a reasonable answer.
 

Related to A bullet and a block (Momentum)

1. What is momentum?

Momentum is a measure of an object's motion, calculated by multiplying its mass and velocity. It is a vector quantity, meaning it has both magnitude and direction.

2. How does a bullet's momentum compare to a block's momentum?

Assuming the bullet and block have the same mass, the bullet's momentum will be significantly greater than the block's if the bullet is traveling at a higher velocity. This is because momentum is directly proportional to velocity.

3. What factors affect the momentum of a bullet and a block?

The momentum of a bullet and a block can be affected by their mass, velocity, and any external forces acting on them, such as friction or air resistance.

4. How is momentum conserved in a bullet and block collision?

In a collision between a bullet and a block, the total momentum before and after the collision remains the same. This means that the momentum of the bullet and block combined before the collision will be equal to the momentum of the bullet and block combined after the collision.

5. What is the significance of momentum in real-life situations?

Momentum is an important concept in physics, and understanding it can help explain and predict the motion of objects in real-life situations. For example, momentum is crucial in understanding the behavior of car crashes and the impact of projectiles in sports such as baseball and golf.

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