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I A Function for multiple 2D Gaussians

  1. Mar 9, 2017 #1
    I'm trying to put together a function that sums multiple 2D Gaussian functions in one graph (i.e.; multiple Gaussian pyramids).

    So far from my research, I formed the following function definition:
    Screen Shot 2017-03-09 at 9.42.13 PM.png

    I'm not sure if my research led me to the correct way of forming the function. Is this how Gaussians can be represented to give me a graph of multiple Gaussians in one surface?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 9, 2017 #2

    BvU

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    Yes. Kind of a landscape pocked with lots of hills.
     
  4. Mar 9, 2017 #3
    Yes, that's what I'm looking for. But I'm worried about the notation, and placement of the i
    Is it also correct for me to say ΣGaussians to represent how many hills, n? - Or there's a more formal notation for that?
     
  5. Mar 9, 2017 #4

    BvU

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    Yes, I would say ##n## is the count of the hills. You confuse the issue somewhat by using the symbol ##f## twice.
     
  6. Mar 9, 2017 #5
    Would it be more proper/clearer to use only the first ##f## and go on directly to saying ##=... ## instead of redefining what ##f## function is?


    Thank you for your answer and affirmation.
     
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2017
  7. Mar 9, 2017 #6

    BvU

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    Either that, or you use a symbol g for a single gaussian:
    upload_2017-3-9_13-57-54.png

    I take it you want to pass ##f## to a surface plot program or something.
     
  8. Mar 9, 2017 #7

    mfb

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    I would put the index i next to the function name: ##g_i(x,y)##

    "f(gaussians)" doesn't make sense. f is a function of x and y: f(x,y).
     
  9. Mar 11, 2017 #8
    Great, thank you for your tip.
     
  10. Mar 11, 2017 #9
    I just realised that, thank you for pointing this out. You're right.
    Thank you very much
     
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