A New Idea for the Origin of Earth's Water

In summary, the Moon was originally a rocky terrestrial planet that lost most of its lighter volatiles during the Sun's transition into a Main-Sequence yellow dwarf star. This also happened to other terrestrial planets due to hot solar winds. The capture of the Moon by Earth resulted in the sharing of the same orbit after the surrounding region cooled. Isaac Asimov's book "Asimov on Astronomy" provides evidence supporting the idea that the Moon is another terrestrial planet. New theories must be published in a peer-reviewed journal before being discussed at PhysicsForums.
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dougettinger
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I wish to explore a new hypothesis for the origin of Earth's water. This new concept is complicated having many phases. I will break down these phases and explain them one at a time.
Simply stated the Earth's original orbit was between Mars and Jupiter close the the 'snow line' thereby having the ability to condense water on its newly forming crust.
A sample of the best consensus hypothesis that I will refute is (https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1991Icar...92...2P)
I will begin with the concept that the Moon was originally a rocky terrestrial planet that orbited at roughly one AU from the Sun and lost the majority of its lighter volatiles including water during the T-Tauri phase of the Sun's transition into a Main-Sequence yellow dwarf star. A similar loss of volatiles eventually occurred for all the other terrestrial planets within 1.5 AU due to the hot solar winds. A unique capture mode between Earth and Moon will occur in which these two planets, one bringing water, will share the same orbit after the Sun surrounding region becomes cooler.
I now refer you to a book, "Asimov on Astronomy" by Isaac Asimov published in 1974. In his chapter, 'Just Mooning Around' he provides compelling evidence of why the Moon is another terrestrial planet. Among some of his more important reasons are the gravitational pull between the parent planet and the Sun. The gravitational pull is greater for the Sun than it is for the parent planet for only one satellite in the solar system and that is Earth's Moon. Another amazing revelation is that the Moon's orbit is everywhere concave about the Sun unlike all the other satellites in the solar system. In my hypothesis, there is no need for a rogue planet to strike Earth and be slowed enough to begin re-coalescing and orbit Earth.
I welcome any ideas or dialogue about this 'outside-the-box' thinking. I will explain next how Earth finds a closer orbit.
By Doug Ettinger
 
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New theories and alternative hypotheses must be published in an appropriate peer-reviewed journal before they can be discussed at PhysicsForums.

This thread is closed... but threads discussing some of the many unusual and interesting properties of the earth/moon system will be welcome.
 
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Related to A New Idea for the Origin of Earth's Water

1. Where did the water on Earth come from?

The most widely accepted theory is that water on Earth originated from comets and asteroids that collided with the planet during its formation. However, a new idea suggests that the water may have actually been trapped within the minerals that make up the Earth's mantle.

2. How does this new idea differ from the traditional theory?

The traditional theory suggests that water was brought to Earth by comets and asteroids, which were rich in ice. The new idea proposes that the water was already present on Earth, but was trapped in minerals during the planet's formation.

3. What evidence supports this new idea?

Recent studies have found that minerals in the Earth's mantle have the ability to store large amounts of water. Additionally, the ratio of hydrogen to deuterium (a heavier isotope of hydrogen) in Earth's water is consistent with the ratio found in the minerals thought to have trapped the water.

4. How does this new idea impact our understanding of the origins of life on Earth?

The presence of water is crucial for the development of life on a planet. If the water on Earth originated from within the planet, it means that the conditions for life may have been present much earlier in Earth's history than previously thought. This could have significant implications for our understanding of the origins of life on our planet.

5. What further research is needed to confirm this new idea?

More studies are needed to analyze the composition of minerals in the Earth's mantle and determine the amount of water they are capable of storing. Additionally, scientists will need to continue studying the hydrogen to deuterium ratio in Earth's water to confirm that it is consistent with the minerals thought to have trapped the water. Further research and analysis will help to solidify this new idea for the origin of Earth's water.

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