The solar system and the Coriolis effect

In summary, the conversation discusses the coriolis effect and its potential impact on the solar system, particularly the moon's behavior. The speaker notes that this effect was not discovered until 1835 and was not considered by earlier scientists. They also mention their own estimation of the effect on the moon, but another speaker points out that this estimation is flawed as it is based on a non-rotating frame. The conversation ends with the understanding that the coriolis effect is an intrinsic phenomenon of movement in a rotating frame of reference.
  • #1
Moises
2
2
TL;DR Summary
Has the coriolis effect on the celestial mechanics of the solar system ever been considered?
After concluding an investigation about the coriolis effect, I wondered how this phenomenon affected the solar system and in particular the moon. Since the moon is a body that moves within the rotating system formed by the sun and the earth, an apparent deviation in the moon's path would be expected but this does not happen, that is, the moon seen from the Earth behaves as if it was not affected by this effect. So far I did not find bibliography dealing with this subject but it is known that the coriolis effect was not discovered until 1835, therefore neither Copernicus, nor Galileo, nor Kepler, nor Newton knew about the existence of this phenomenon of movement, which will occur provided there is a body in motion within a system with angular velocity. Nor does Einstein seem to have addressed this problem.
I can estimate the vector and the position in time of a body in motion under the coriolis effect and the surprising thing is that when I consider this effect in the sun-earth-moon model, it results in the moon moving away from the Earth to an average speed of 260Km / h describing a spiral path orbit. In the case of the Earth and the planets, these would also be in the sun-center rotation system of the galaxy. And in this case the same would happen with the Earth's orbit, only that the speed at which it would move away from the sun would be 1Km / h (which is not much in a short period of time but in a decade it would be very considerable). Nor is this phenomenon observed. That to my understanding suggests two quite controversial possibilities
 
Astronomy news on Phys.org
  • #2
Moises said:
So far I did not find bibliography dealing with this subject but it is known that the coriolis effect was not discovered until 1835, therefore neither Copernicus, nor Galileo, nor Kepler, nor Newton knew about the existence of this phenomenon of movement, which will occur provided there is a body in motion within a system with angular velocity. Nor does Einstein seem to have addressed this problem.

They didn't need to consider it because they used non-rotating systems and there is no coriolis effect.

Moises said:
I can estimate the vector and the position in time of a body in motion under the coriolis effect and the surprising thing is that when I consider this effect in the sun-earth-moon model, it results in the moon moving away from the Earth to an average speed of 260Km / h describing a spiral path orbit.

That means there is an error in your estimation.
 
  • #3
DrStupid said:
They didn't need to consider it because they used non-rotating systems and there is no coriolis effect.

The coriolis effect is an intrinsic phenomenon of movement that manifests in every body or particle that moves in a rotating frame of reference and the solar system is a rotating frame of reference (although analytically it can be studied as a system at rest, the effect coriolis is a real effect, that is, it cannot be removed from the analysis. See the general acceleration equation)

That means there is an error in your estimation.

I hope you can make your estimation to show that my estimation have an error
 
  • #4
Moises said:
I hope you can make your estimation to show that my estimation have an error

He already told you your error: you are trying to apply the Coriolis effect in a non-rotating frame, but in a non-rotating frame there is no Coriolis effect. So the "estimate" of the effect in a non-rotating frame is zero.
 
  • #5
The OP is based on a misunderstanding. Thread closed.
 

1. What is the solar system?

The solar system is a collection of planets, moons, and other celestial bodies that orbit around the sun. It also includes smaller objects such as asteroids, comets, and dust particles.

2. How many planets are in the solar system?

There are eight planets in the solar system: Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. In addition, there are five dwarf planets: Ceres, Pluto, Haumea, Makemake, and Eris.

3. What is the Coriolis effect?

The Coriolis effect is the apparent deflection of objects or fluids (such as air or water) due to the rotation of the Earth. This effect causes objects in the Northern Hemisphere to appear to curve to the right and objects in the Southern Hemisphere to appear to curve to the left.

4. How does the Coriolis effect affect weather patterns?

The Coriolis effect plays a significant role in the formation of global wind patterns and ocean currents. In the Northern Hemisphere, winds and currents tend to curve to the right, while in the Southern Hemisphere they tend to curve to the left. This is why hurricanes in the Northern Hemisphere spin counterclockwise and in the Southern Hemisphere they spin clockwise.

5. Is the Coriolis effect the same on all planets?

No, the Coriolis effect is not the same on all planets. It depends on the size and rotation rate of the planet. For example, the Coriolis effect is much weaker on Mars due to its smaller size and slower rotation compared to Earth. On gas giants like Jupiter and Saturn, the Coriolis effect is much stronger due to their larger size and faster rotation.

Similar threads

  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
Replies
13
Views
287
  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
4
Replies
122
Views
7K
  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
2
Replies
52
Views
3K
  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
Replies
10
Views
1K
  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
Replies
15
Views
1K
  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
Replies
12
Views
5K
  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
Replies
24
Views
1K
  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
Replies
18
Views
3K
Replies
17
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
18
Views
1K
Back
Top