A question about consistency of in-text bracketed reference numbers

In summary, the conversation discusses the use of square brackets to indicate sources in a paper and whether it is consistent. The author uses them in two different ways - as a parenthetical statement and as a noun in the sentence. The question is whether this is acceptable or if one form is preferred. Additionally, there is a discussion about the use of "the obtained solution" versus "the solution thereby obtained" and whether both forms are acceptable. A conclusion is reached that both forms are acceptable and that grammar and syntax have evolved over time.
  • #1
nomadreid
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This is not a contextual question, but a stylistic one; hence it doesn't seem to belong in the other threads.

I am proof-reading a paper, and I am unsure about the way the author uses square brackets for the indication of (numbered) sources. In order not to be quoting a source without authorization or citation, I will make up an example that follows the author's style:

"This solution can be used to develop further examples of the application of this technique [18], [26]. In particular, in [26], the transformations are used as new variables..."

Note that he uses the square brackets in two different ways: in the first case "technique [18], [26]" , he uses them to say "see [18] and [26] for details", whereas in the final case,"In particular, in [26]," he is using the brackets as a substitute for the title etc. of the source. Put another way, the first case is an aside, a parenthetical statement, whereas the second case is used as a noun in the sentence itself. This appears to be to be inconsistent.

Am I being too picky, or if not, what is the solution?

While I am here, the author occasionally (thinking in the structure of his native language) occasionally uses "the obtained solution"; more natural would be something like "the solution thereby obtained", but is "the obtained solution" also acceptable?

Thanks for any guidance.
 
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  • #2
nomadreid said:
Am I being too picky

You are being too picky.
 
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  • #3
OK, thanks, Vanadium 50. It is certainly easiest to leave the text as is.
I presume your answer goes also for the question about "obtained".
 
  • #4
nomadreid said:
While I am here, the author occasionally (thinking in the structure of his native language) occasionally uses "the obtained solution"; more natural would be something like "the solution thereby obtained", but is "the obtained solution" also acceptable?
Both forms appear acceptable*. The first uses the past participle of the verb obtain as an adjective to modify solution. Your preferred form retains obtained as a following adverb. Example:
I own the red painted truck.
I own the truck painted red.

*As has been mentioned by grammarians in other threads, much of the grammar and syntactical forms I learned ~60 years ago are effectively obsolete due to numerous changes in predicate and propositional logic. The general term adverb seems safe to apply to most modifiers derived from verbs. :cool:
 
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  • #5
Thanks, Klystron. Interesting way to look at it.
 

Related to A question about consistency of in-text bracketed reference numbers

1. What is the purpose of in-text bracketed reference numbers?

In-text bracketed reference numbers are used to provide a citation or reference to a source within the body of a written work. They allow the reader to easily locate and verify the source of information being presented.

2. How should in-text bracketed reference numbers be formatted?

In-text bracketed reference numbers should be placed directly after the information being cited or referenced, within parentheses or brackets. They should be in numerical order and correspond to a full citation in the reference list at the end of the document.

3. Can in-text bracketed reference numbers be used for both direct quotes and paraphrased information?

Yes, in-text bracketed reference numbers should be used for both direct quotes and paraphrased information. They help to give credit to the original source and avoid plagiarism.

4. Do in-text bracketed reference numbers need to be included for every source used?

Yes, in-text bracketed reference numbers should be included for every source used in a written work. This includes both primary and secondary sources.

5. Are there any specific guidelines for using in-text bracketed reference numbers in different citation styles?

Yes, different citation styles may have specific guidelines for using in-text bracketed reference numbers. It is important to consult the appropriate style guide for the specific format and placement of in-text bracketed reference numbers.

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