A summation that "feeds back into itself"

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In summary, a summation that "feeds back into itself" involves using the output of a calculation as input for the next calculation, creating a loop. This process can have significant implications in various fields and cannot be solved definitively, but can provide insights into the behavior of a system. Real-life examples include population growth, compound interest, and predator-prey relationships.
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tovisonnenberg
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Hi everyone! I need to use sigma notation to build a summation that "feeds back into itself". By that I mean that it should model a sum whose terms are f(x) + f(f(x)) + f(f(f(x))) and so on. How would I do this?
 
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You can write f(f(f(x))) as f3(x) and that 3 can be replaced by a variable, too.
 
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Related to A summation that "feeds back into itself"

1. What is a summation that "feeds back into itself"?

A summation that "feeds back into itself" is a mathematical concept where the result of a summation is used as one of the terms in the next iteration of the summation. This creates a feedback loop, where the result of the summation keeps changing with each iteration.

2. What is an example of a summation that "feeds back into itself"?

An example of a summation that "feeds back into itself" is the Fibonacci sequence, where each term is the sum of the two previous terms. For example, the sequence starts with 0 and 1, and the next term is 0+1=1. The following term is 1+1=2, and so on.

3. What is the significance of a summation that "feeds back into itself"?

A summation that "feeds back into itself" has significant applications in various fields, such as economics, physics, and computer science. It can model complex systems and help predict future outcomes based on previous iterations.

4. What are the challenges of working with a summation that "feeds back into itself"?

One of the main challenges of working with a summation that "feeds back into itself" is that it can be challenging to solve analytically. This means that it is often necessary to use numerical methods to approximate the solution. Additionally, small changes in the initial values can lead to significant differences in the final result, making it challenging to predict outcomes accurately.

5. How is a summation that "feeds back into itself" different from a regular summation?

A summation that "feeds back into itself" differs from a regular summation in that the result of each iteration is used as a term in the next iteration, creating a feedback loop. In a regular summation, the terms are independent of each other, and the result is simply the sum of all the terms.

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