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Acceleration down an inclined plane

  1. Mar 14, 2015 #1
    • User informed about mandatory use of template in homework forums.
    Hello,

    After collecting data for the classic physics experiment - motion down an inclined plane, I assembled my graph, and found something startling; in my graph, acceleration is proportional to mass (use the attached file for reference).

    Theoretically, my graph should resemble the inverse, by a ∝ 1/m.

    Can anyone explain possible reasons for this?

    The experiment was running a margarine container down a wooden slope, varying the mass of the margarine container by adding brass weights each time.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 14, 2015 #2

    Orodruin

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    What makes you think so?
     
  4. Mar 14, 2015 #3
    F=ma, therefore a=F/m, which implies as the mass increases, acceleration decreases.
     
  5. Mar 14, 2015 #4

    Orodruin

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    What is F in your case?
     
  6. Mar 14, 2015 #5
    F=mg(sinθ-cosθ)

    where θ is the angle of the inclined plane.

    This is the net force of the block down the plane.
     
  7. Mar 14, 2015 #6

    Orodruin

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    And inserting this into your expression for the acceleration gives?

    Edit: you are also missing a friction coefficient...
     
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