1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Adiabatic, isothermal, or isovolumetric

  1. Jun 22, 2006 #1
    Here's my problem:

    300 calories of heat are added to a gas as the internal energy of the gas increases by 500 calories. The described thermodynamic process is best described as?

    My guess is that the process is isothermal b/c work is being done in the system.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 22, 2006 #2
    Since temperature is usually the measure of internal energy, it's unlikely that the internal energy increased without the temperature being changed. So that's probably not an isothermal process.
     
  4. Jun 22, 2006 #3
    if that's the case then maybe it's isovolumetric b/c adiabatic can't have heat flow into or out of the system. any other ideas?
     
  5. Jun 22, 2006 #4

    Andrew Mason

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    In what form is the 200 calories of energy added to the gas (since it is not in the form of heat)? What does that tell you about what happens to the volume of the gas?

    What makes you think this is a choice between adiabatic, isovolumetric and isothermal?

    AM
     
  6. Jun 22, 2006 #5
    It's a homework question and the answers are adiabatic, isovolumetric, isothermal or none. as for your other question about the other 200 calories, I have no clue. but I would think that the volume would stay the same. is that wrong?
     
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2006
  7. Jun 22, 2006 #6

    Andrew Mason

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    Then the correct answer is "None".

    As you observed, work is being done on the gas. That is what increases the internal energy of the gas over and above the heat that is added.

    AM
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: Adiabatic, isothermal, or isovolumetric
Loading...