Admittance into university abroad

  • Schools
  • Thread starter MWH
  • Start date
  • Tags
    University
In summary, the speaker is interested in studying mathematics and/or physics and wants to do research in these fields, but does not have the required diploma from secondary school. They live in the Netherlands and are looking for opportunities to get admitted into university abroad in less than a few years. They have heard about roundabout ways to get admitted into universities and are wondering if this applies to them. The speaker also mentions their discouraging environment in secondary school and their desire to go to university. They have a certificate in English but have not been able to get admitted in the Netherlands. They are specifically interested in studying in an English-speaking country and are willing to put in effort to get admitted. They also mention the possibility of taking an entrance examination in Switzerland at
  • #1

MWH

15
0
I want to study mathematics and/or physics, at this point aiming for doing research in either a field in mathematics or/and (theoretical) physics, although I don't have the required diploma from secondary school. I live in the Netherlands and there are merely laborious, impractical ways to get admitted into university in my case. Sadly, I have to be 21 or older to take an entrance examination. I think I'm ready for university for a couple of reasons, although there are no other than the common ways to get admitted. I'd like to ask whether there are any opportunities for me to get admitted into university abroad and how this can be fulfilled in a time less than a few years. To add, I've heard there are roundabout ways for one to get admitted into university. Is this true, where, and does/could this apply to me too?
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
I don't know how things work in other countries, but in the US it will be hard to get into any physics or math program of repute without a secondary school diploma.
 
  • #3
In Switzerland, more specifically at the ETH (where I'm currently studying) I believe you can be admitted by taking an entrance examination at any age, although if you're under 18 you will need your parents consent. The application deadline is something in April I think and the examinations will be in August/September
 
  • #4
fss said:
I don't know how things work in other countries, but in the US it will be hard to get into any physics or math program of repute without a secondary school diploma.

I do have a secondary school diploma, although its a diploma of higher general secondary education, in contrast to pre-university education. At least here in the Netherlands it is determined what 'level' you will continue studying at in the first year of secondary school. At the time I was 12 years old and in a discouraging environment as regards to studying and thinking about my future. Today I can only regret that and seek for the best solution as I only want to go to university. I'd get admitted into higher vocational education with my diploma. There are a few programs to move up to university for cases like me, although, especially with physics and mathematics, these are very laborious, incomplete and are offered at somewhat distant schools I can only reach by constantly changing transport and it would be roundabout to go and live in lodgings in this case. Lastly, my knowledge about mathematics and/or physics is either adequate or inadequate for a matter of weeks and I've got a certificate in English but thus far this plus my ambitions apparently hadn't been able to get myself admitted in the Netherlands. I've understand it is hard to get into any physics or math program of repute in the US, but what do you think is possible for me in the US, given that I'd show much effort?

Anden said:
In Switzerland, more specifically at the ETH (where I'm currently studying) I believe you can be admitted by taking an entrance examination at any age, although if you're under 18 you will need your parents consent. The application deadline is something in April I think and the examinations will be in August/September

I'm indeed under 18. I'll do some research, although I'd prefer an English speaking country. Would the lack of knowledge of any language except for English and Dutch be an issue if I'd decide to go and study there?
 
  • #5
I believe you have to do a language test as part of the examinations, it's in high german. The language test is mandatory even if you have a secondary school diploma, the only way to be exempted from it (as I was) is to get a language certificate (for example a Goethe Certificate, TestDaf, Österreichisches Sprachdiplom C1 or something equivalent), though that's on the ETH. There might be different rules at the EPFL which is in the french-speaking part of Switzerland.
 
Last edited:

1. What are the requirements for admittance into university abroad?

The requirements for admittance into university abroad vary depending on the country and the specific university. Generally, they include a high school diploma or equivalent, standardized test scores (such as the SAT or ACT), letters of recommendation, and a personal statement or essay. Some universities may also require language proficiency tests, such as the TOEFL or IELTS.

2. Can I get financial aid or scholarships for studying abroad?

Yes, many universities offer financial aid and scholarships for international students. You can also research external funding opportunities, such as government-sponsored scholarships or private organizations that offer grants for studying abroad. It is important to thoroughly research and apply for these opportunities early, as they may have specific deadlines and eligibility requirements.

3. Are there any language proficiency requirements for studying abroad?

Yes, most universities require international students to have a certain level of proficiency in the language of instruction. This may be demonstrated through standardized tests like the TOEFL or IELTS, or through other means such as a language evaluation by a language school or university. Some universities may also offer language courses for international students to improve their skills before beginning their studies.

4. Is it possible to transfer credits from a university abroad back to my home university?

Yes, it is possible to transfer credits from a university abroad back to your home university. However, this process may vary depending on your home university's policies and the specific courses you take abroad. It is important to consult with your academic advisor or study abroad office before making any decisions about which courses to take and how they may transfer back to your home university.

5. Can I work while studying abroad?

The rules and regulations for working while studying abroad vary depending on the country and university. Some countries may allow international students to work a certain number of hours per week, while others may not allow it at all. It is important to research the specific policies of your host country and university before seeking employment. Additionally, your student visa may have restrictions on working, so be sure to check with your host country's embassy or consulate for more information.

Suggested for: Admittance into university abroad

Back
Top