Advice for a Computer Science major interested in math/physics

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Hey guys. I'm a senior in high school and I was recently accepted in to Carnegie Mellon's computer science program for undergrad early decision (so that's where I'll attend). I'm pretty confident I'll stick with computer science, but I'm also interested in math and physics. I have a few questions.

1. I'm thinking of double majoring in math or physics with a B.S. in computer science being the primary degree (AP Credit should let me be able to do this course number wise). Would I be able to go to grad school in math or physics with just a double major in one of them? Would it count against me? This is more of a down-the-road question, as I would probably just switch my primary major altogether if I knew I wanted to go to grad school in math or physics right after undergrad.

2. How important is the school you go to for undergrad for grad school admissions? I ask because while Carnegie Mellon charts fairly well on ARWU for math and physics, it isn't amazing in those subjects.

3. If I were to go to grad school in math or physics and eventually get a Ph.D., I would probably want to do related research afterwards (e.g. as a professor at a university). Are these types of jobs fairly available, or is there stiff competition for them?

Thanks for any help. It's kind of late here, so sorry for any typos.
 

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  • #2
Simon Bridge
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1. grad school requirements depend on the college - ask at Carnegie Mellon.
2. same as above - but your secondary school will have no impact on grad school at all.
3. professorships are very desirable jobs, they carry tenure so colleges are reluctant to create them.
Therefore - the competition is very stiff.
 
  • #3
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1. I don't think it's necessarily a bad idea to double major, especially if you have AP credits going in and aren't sure what you want to do yet. I started out double majoring in physics and EE but my advisor changed my mind. Essentially, she asked if I wanted to be really good at one thing or mediocre at two. I realized I wanted to go to grad school for physics so dropped the engineering major in order to take more physics classes. You will probably find a preference by the end of your first year or two.
 

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