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Advice on doing the Egg Drop challenge with High Schoolers

  1. Sep 9, 2015 #1
    Hello

    I'm relatively new to teaching physics and was wondering if you anyone had advices as to the parameters to put on this challenge.

    How high should I drop their containers from? 2nd or 3rd story?

    When I was in school, I think we could only use glue and toothpicks, but I don't remember if there was like a weight limit on it.

    I was thinking popsicle sticks could also be good.

    I would love any advice from people who have successfully done this challenge before. Thanks!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 9, 2015 #2

    BvU

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    There's 99 results for a search for the word egg. Perhaps there's something useful amongst all that ?
     
  4. Sep 9, 2015 #3
    Really? I must not be using this right. I searched Egg in the titles of threads on this forum and got nothing. Care to weigh in?
     
  5. Sep 9, 2015 #4

    BvU

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  6. Sep 9, 2015 #5
    Thanks, I had a look at the past conversations about it. I guess what I was looking for was advice with some thoughts about what worked well and what didn't. Most of the conversations are from students about how best to make a container.

    But I guess in looking at the replies, it seems there is no consensus BEST way to do the project. I know that I don't want to use parachutes, and I would really like to limit the materials used. There was a conversation that seemed like there were really unique materials allowed, but it seems like that didn't go anywhere.

    If there any teachers around that have run these challenges before, please chime in and talk about what worked. Thanks
     
  7. Sep 9, 2015 #6

    Andy Resnick

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    Isn't this the entire point of the project? Like, the whole idea of problem-based learning?
     
  8. Sep 9, 2015 #7
    In my opinion I would say yes in regards to creating a solution for the central problem/task. But I would say not necessarily as far as the parameters that you put on it. Project-based and Problem-based units can still have limitations as far as what you can do, similar to how real world tasks are limited by money or weight or whatever other practical limitations may exist. I was hoping to hear some experiences (positive and negative) so I can find the sweet spot between "it's practically impossible" and "it's far too easy."

    For example, if it is less than a two story drop and students can use tissues to pad the inside and use parachutes and any other materials from home, I just don't really see a high level of design challenge. It's more of a challenge in what materials you choose.

    I guess I was thinking that there would be a "go to" set of rules for this challenge, and within those rules, the students would draw upon content, creativity, and the design process to succeed. But I've seen in these conversations as little as 3 meters height all the way to 25 meters.
     
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