Airfoil characteristics for NACA 65-210

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In summary, the conversation discusses the analysis of an airfoil at 4 degrees and the required inputs for a MATLAB code. The wing has a span of 15 feet and uses NACA 65-210 airfoil sections with a zero-lift angle of -1.2 degrees. The wing is also untwisted, so the root and tip twist angles are both 0. To complete the analysis, the parameters of root lift curve slope and tip lift curve slope, as well as the zero-lift angle at the root and tip, must be found for the specific NACA 65-210 airfoil. This information can be found in airfoil databases or through literature searches.
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xzi86
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I have to analyze this airfoil at 4 degrees: "Consider a wing of span 15 feet. The root chord is 2.381 feet. The tip chord is 0.953 feet. The airfoils used are NACA 65-210 sections, which have a zeo-lift angle of –1.2 degrees. The wing is untwisted."

Now I've got a MATLAB code to analyze this airfoil. It requires the following inputs:
input root chord = 2.381
input tip chord = 0.953
input span = 15
input Root twist angle in degrees = 0
input tip twist angle in degrees = 0
input root lift curve slope in units/ radian = ??
input lift curve slope at the tip, in units/radian = ??
input angle of attack, in degrees = 4
input zero-lift angle at the root = -1.2
input zero lift angle at the tip = -1.2

Since the wing is untwisted, root twist and tip twist would be 0 right? I don't know how to find root lift curve slope at the root and tip. Is this information I'm supposed to find specifically for the NACA 65-210? Where would I find this information? Also zero-lift angle would be -1.2 for root and tip right?
Thanks a lot for helping.
 
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  • #2
the uiuc database or theory of wing sections are possible databases. And yes your zero lift at root and tip are both -1.2 degrees.
 
  • #3


Hello there!

Yes, since the wing is untwisted, the root twist and tip twist angles would be 0. As for the root lift curve slope and tip lift curve slope, these are specific parameters that you would need to find for the NACA 65-210 airfoil. You can typically find this information in airfoil databases or by doing a literature search on the specific airfoil.

As for the zero-lift angle, yes, it would be -1.2 for both the root and tip. This is also a parameter that you would need to find for the NACA 65-210 airfoil.

I hope this helps! Let me know if you have any other questions. Good luck with your analysis!
 

Related to Airfoil characteristics for NACA 65-210

1. What is an airfoil?

An airfoil is a curved shape that is designed to create lift when it moves through air. It is commonly used in the design of airplane wings and other aerodynamic surfaces.

2. What are NACA airfoils?

NACA (National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics) airfoils are a series of airfoil shapes that were developed by the NACA in the early 20th century. They are characterized by a four-digit number that describes the shape of the airfoil.

3. What does the number in "NACA 65-210" refer to?

The number in "NACA 65-210" refers to the shape of the airfoil. The first two digits (65) indicate the maximum thickness of the airfoil as a percentage of its chord length, and the last two digits (210) indicate the location of the maximum thickness along the chord length as a percentage.

4. What are the characteristics of NACA 65-210 airfoils?

NACA 65-210 airfoils are known for their high lift and low drag characteristics. They have a relatively thick and smooth camber, which allows for efficient lift generation at high angles of attack. They also have a relatively low drag coefficient, making them ideal for use in high-speed aircraft.

5. How are NACA 65-210 airfoils used in aircraft design?

NACA 65-210 airfoils are commonly used in the design of airplane wings, particularly in high-speed and high-performance aircraft. They are also used in other aerodynamic surfaces such as propeller blades and helicopter rotor blades. The specific airfoil shape and its placement on the aircraft depend on the intended use and performance requirements.

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