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Algebra - Is it possible to solve it in terms of r?

  1. Dec 15, 2011 #1

    Femme_physics

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    Last edited by a moderator: May 5, 2017
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 15, 2011 #2

    BruceW

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    perhaps too much help there... I was thinking of writing a hint like 'what can you do to both sides to get r on only one side of the equation'
     
  4. Dec 15, 2011 #3

    Doc Al

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    Oops... you're probably right, Bruce.
     
  5. Dec 15, 2011 #4

    Femme_physics

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    I can still see the original message in my email you know? :wink:

    Thanks, at any rate. I seemed to have forgotten basic algebra!
     
  6. Dec 15, 2011 #5

    Doc Al

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    Yeah, I know. :tongue:
     
  7. Dec 15, 2011 #6
    Is that a Pi or an r?
     
  8. Dec 15, 2011 #7

    Mark44

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    Both [itex]\pi[/itex] and r are in the equation.
     
  9. Dec 15, 2011 #8

    Mark44

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    You ended up with 100[itex]\pi[/itex]r4 = 4000[itex]\cdot[/itex]103r.

    Move everything over to one side, and take the largest common factor out of both terms. The equation should be pretty easy to solve from there.
     
  10. Dec 16, 2011 #9

    HallsofIvy

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    Is it really "[itex]1000\cdot10^3[/itex]". That seems a very strange thing to write. It is, of course, the same as [itex]10^6= 1000000[/itex].
     
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