1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Amplitude of oscillations depends on the amount of damping?

  1. Jan 8, 2009 #1
    Which one of the following statements about an oscillating mechanical system at resonance, when it oscillates with a constant amplitude, is not correct?

    A The amplitude of oscillations depends on the amount of damping.
    B The frequency of the applied force is the same as the natural frequency of oscillation of the system.
    C The total energy of the system is constant.
    D The applied force prevents the amplitude from becoming too large.

    The answer is A. Can someone please explain why A in incorrect, and why D is correct?

    Thank you very much.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 8, 2009 #2

    Redbelly98

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    Re: Resonance

    That's weird, I would agree with you that statement A is correct, and D is wrong.
     
  4. Jan 8, 2009 #3

    turin

    User Avatar
    Homework Helper

    Re: Resonance

    The applied force overcomes the damping. The damping prevents the oscillation from becoming too large. If there were no damping, the applied force would cause the oscillation to grow without bound. If you're an engineer, that would be a pole on the imaginary axis; the damping shifts the poles into the left-half plane. What I find wierd is that A also is correct: if the damping is stronger, ceteris paribus, then the oscillations should be smaller. In other words, the further into the left half plane, the weaker and more spread out the resonance peak will be.
     
  5. Jan 14, 2009 #4
    Re: Resonance

    the A is incorrect because it says when the oscillations are constant, which means we arein the steady-state response. Damping shows its effects in the transient time, not in the steady-state time, so the amplitude has become larger and larger, and it became constant eventually, and afterwards there will be no effect from damping.

    it might have, in fact, damping effects depending on the frequency of oscillations, where the system is unable to reach the utmost value.
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2009
  6. Jan 14, 2009 #5

    turin

    User Avatar
    Homework Helper

    Re: Resonance

    Wrong. The damping coefficient appears in the denominator of the steady-state response. Larger damping coefficient in denom. leads to decreased amplitude.
     
  7. Jan 14, 2009 #6

    Redbelly98

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    Re: Resonance

    I'm with turin on this. If damping is present, and the mass is moving, then damping must be showing it's effects. The damping force is
    - β v​
    so as long as v≠0, the damping has an effect.
     
  8. Jan 15, 2009 #7
    Re: Resonance

    to me, when it is in resonant frequency means it is a positive feedback, and essentially goes unbound. Since it doesn't go unbound (becomes constant), it is limited to some saturation limits. Therefore, the magnitude is dependent on some saturation limits. This saturation can be caused by a very high damping, but might be from somewhere else; however, the shape of the signal is still dependent on the damping.
     
  9. Jan 15, 2009 #8

    Redbelly98

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    Re: Resonance

    Well yes, clearly in a real mechanical system there will usually be something preventing the amplitude from exceeding a certain maximum. Either that, or it will simply break when driven beyond some point.

    That being said, if the amplitude is below this maximum-- OR if we are talking about a textbook, hypothetical system with no maximum amplitude-- then it will be the damping that limits the amplitude at resonance.
     
  10. Feb 16, 2009 #9
    Re: Resonance

    what is resonance?when it occurs?
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2009
  11. Feb 16, 2009 #10
    Re: Resonance

    naven8 a system will resonate(vibrate with maximum amplitude) when a forcing frequency matches a natural frequency.Think of pushing someone on a swing.


    The amplitude of oscillations depends on the damping and on the applied force and on the system.The thing that is incorrect is the question itself,it is not detailed enough.
     
  12. Feb 16, 2009 #11
    Re: Resonance

    In electronic system(circuit) how resonance occur?
    how to measure the frequency of a microwave in a wave guide using resonance?
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2009
  13. Feb 16, 2009 #12

    djeitnstine

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    Re: Resonance

    I'm with turin and redbelly on this. D has to be false and A true. Even thinking about it in layman's terms...D is simply counter intuitive.

    Also to mharaghi...do some resonance calculations and play around with the damping constant. You will find the amplitude can change drastically with slightly different damping constants
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: Amplitude of oscillations depends on the amount of damping?
  1. Damped Oscillator (Replies: 6)

  2. Damped Oscillator (Replies: 2)

Loading...