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Homework Help: Another Center of Mass problem What in the world

  1. Oct 22, 2006 #1
    Chapter 7, Problem 56


    The drawing shows a sulfur dioxide molecule. It consists of two oxygen atoms and a sulfur atom. A sulfur atom is twice as massive as an oxygen atom. Using this information and the data procvided in the drawing, find the y coordinate of the center of mass of the sulfur dioxide molecule. Express your answer in nanometers. (1 nm = 10-9 m).

    http://img217.imageshack.us/img217/8702/ch07p56ob2.gif [Broken]



    I really need a hint on how to start this problem. I think I need to find one of the sides of the triangle?

    Hate to bother u so much Doc but I really want to get these problems down.

    Thanks
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 2, 2017
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 22, 2006 #2

    radou

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    Step 1: Find the definition of the center of mass.
     
  4. Oct 22, 2006 #3
    The center of mass is a point that represents teh average location for the total mass of a system.
     
  5. Oct 22, 2006 #4

    radou

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    OK, how would you express that mathematically?

    (Hint: http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/Hbase/cm.html" [Broken])
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 2, 2017
  6. Oct 22, 2006 #5
    Well I understand the equation Ycm = m1y1 + m2Y2 + m3Y3/ m1+m2+m3.

    but I dont' know how I'd go around applying it to this problem.

    Thanks for the tips though
     
  7. Oct 22, 2006 #6

    radou

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    If you understand the equation, then you should know how to apply it to the problem.
     
  8. Oct 22, 2006 #7
    I can find the length of Y of the oxygen with Trig yes, but what is Y for sulfur?

    Thanks
     
  9. Oct 22, 2006 #8

    Office_Shredder

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    It should be obvious that's zero
     
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