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Programs Applicant for Physics PhD Programs

  1. Mar 15, 2010 #1
    Hi there. I have a friend who's currently in Caltech and is applying to various graduate schools to pursue a Physics PhD. I'm practically in the same path as he is, but I'm a senior applying to undergraduate schools as a Physics major (although I might go for a Math PhD instead). He gave me a link that was basically a resume and it looked absolutely astounding. However, I have no idea how to compare it to other graduate applicants.
    Here's the link: (removed)

    As a high school senior, he got accepted into Harvard and Caltech, but he opted for Caltech (which is a very uncommon thing to do) because of the scientist-esque approach that Caltech has on its courses and etc. Based purely on this and not on any scores, how strong does he look as a graduate applicant? He applied to a lot of the top schools and a few safeties.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 15, 2010
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 15, 2010 #2

    Vanadium 50

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    I don't think posting someone else's CV for critique is appropriate. There are certainly privacy issues.

    One thing that did occur to me in reading it - in business, it may be acceptable to "pad" your resume. In science, one should never do this, particularly if it is easily checked.
     
  4. Mar 16, 2010 #3
    Sorry if posting his resume isn't allowed on these forums. He let me do it though so I don't think I breached any privacy rights in that regard. Everything he put was truthful (that's what he told me anyways); I thought his GPA in Caltech and his research were pretty good anyways. I was just wondering how it would look in critique of actual Physics/Math PhDs who already know how the system works basically.
     
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