Are Photons Truly Particles or Simply Waves?

In summary, the conversation discusses the concept of photons as particles and how the photoelectric effect supposedly proves this. The speaker believes that electrons are emitted due to the penetration of the wave front into the metal, and that the minimum frequency needed for this process corresponds to the longest wavelength that can fit between the lattice structure. However, the other speaker requests more information on the which-way experiment and the photon antibunching experiment before settling into this belief. References are also requested.
  • #1
barquentine
2
0
I really don't believe that photons can be particles.
Supposedly the photoelectric effect "proves" they are.
I believe that electrons are emitted as a result of short-distance penetration of the wave front into the metal, disturbing the bonds. This would also fit the known fact that the frequency of light must be above a certain value or electrons are not emitted. I'm betting that the minimum frequency corresponds to the longest wavelength that can "fit between" the lattice structure.
Comments please?
 
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  • #2
barquentine said:
I really don't believe that photons can be particles.
Supposedly the photoelectric effect "proves" they are.
I believe that electrons are emitted as a result of short-distance penetration of the wave front into the metal, disturbing the bonds. This would also fit the known fact that the frequency of light must be above a certain value or electrons are not emitted. I'm betting that the minimum frequency corresponds to the longest wavelength that can "fit between" the lattice structure.
Comments please?

You need to explain the which-way experiment and the photon antibunching experiment before you settle into your "belief".

Zz.
 
  • #3
ZapperZ said:
You need to explain the which-way experiment and the photon antibunching experiment before you settle into your "belief".

Zz.
Please provide references.
 
  • #4
barquentine said:
Please provide references.

I've provided references to these many times over on here. You're welcome to do a search in the QM forum (where this should have been posted in the first place). Furthermore, aren't you a bit worried that you are not aware of such experiments, yet you have no problem with making outright statements with such confidence? One normally has to do a lot of "homework" first to make sure one knows everything there is to know out there before proclaiming something.

Example of which way experiment: J.J. Thorn et al. Am. J. Phys. v.72 p.1210 (2004).

Example of antibunching experiment: any single-photon sources paper or H. Paul, Rev. Mod. Phys. v.54, p.1061 (1982).

Example of multiphoton photoemission: K. Giesen et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. v.55, p.300 (1985); W.S. Fann et al., Phys. Rev. B v.44, p.10980 (1991).

Zz.
 
  • #5
barquentine said:
I'm betting that the minimum frequency corresponds to the longest wavelength that can "fit between" the lattice structure.
Comments please?
I'll take that bet. How much you want to make it?
 

1. What is a photon?

A photon is a fundamental particle that carries electromagnetic energy. It is the basic unit of light and has properties of both a particle and a wave.

2. Are photons particles or waves?

Photons exhibit characteristics of both particles and waves. They have no mass and travel at the speed of light, similar to particles. However, they also have wave-like properties such as interference and diffraction.

3. How do photons interact with matter?

When photons interact with matter, they can be absorbed, reflected, or transmitted. The specific interaction depends on the energy of the photon and the properties of the matter it encounters.

4. Can photons have different energies?

Yes, photons can have different energies, which determine their frequency and wavelength. The energy of a photon is directly proportional to its frequency and inversely proportional to its wavelength.

5. How are photons detected?

Photons can be detected using various methods, such as photodiodes, photomultiplier tubes, and charge-coupled devices. These devices use the particle-like properties of photons to measure their presence and energy.

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