Excited electrons' behaviour, how do they work?

In summary, the conversation covers various topics related to electrons and their behavior, including their tendency to return to ground state when excited, the role of photons in this process, the concept of accelerating charges and its relation to EM waves, the photoelectric phenomenon and its ability to produce other electrons, the ability of electrons to absorb light, the effect of a magnetic field on electrons, and the role of electrons in reflecting light and creating heat. The speaker is seeking concrete answers to their questions, but is advised to focus on a specific scenario and question for a more focused and productive discussion.
  • #1
GuillemVS
12
1
TL;DR Summary
In how many ways can electrons go back to ground state?
Mainly I want to know the following thing: electrons when excited they tend to want to go back to ground state, right? One way is by photons, but how does that work? Accelerating charges creates EM waves, but in this case there was no acceleration, right? Or is the term accelerating only a way to say from high to normal (as we say that they "move a level of energy" when they don't physically move, they just have more energy than normal).

Another thing that I've read is the photoelectric phenomenon (is that how is called?), can excited electrons produce other electrons? As they produce photons, right? I think I read that they can, but then how can you get to choose wether if they are going to create a photon or a electron? For example: a metal receives all the lights and "makes sure" to create a electric field opposite (to neutralize) the EM wave's electric field, ending with the light (so no light that's going to go through the metal, right?). But also, electrons absorb light, do they? Or they just want to overcome the electric field, or both at the same time?
The magnetic field will keep moving? Or it will be absorbed by the metal too?

Another different but similar question: objects reflect light that is of the same color, right? Then it means that electrons gets to "choose" wether if to throw the photon or create heat? But... Isn't heat a infrared photon? And how do they "choose" if that wavelength or frequency is the wanted as photon or not?

Hopefully I didn't miss understood everything so badly.

Thank you for reading, I will appreciate concrete answers.

Sorry if there are mistakes, I'm a non English phone writing curious person right now xD
 
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  • #2
This is way too many questions covering way too much ground for a single PF discussion thread.

Please take some time to pick a single, specific scenario involving electrons, and formulate a single, specific question about something to do with that scenario that you find confusing or hard to understand. Then you can start a new thread to ask that question. That will lead to a much more focused and productive discussion.

This thread is closed.
 

1. What causes electrons to become excited?

Electrons become excited when they absorb energy from an external source, such as heat, light, or electricity. This causes them to jump to a higher energy level, or orbit, around the nucleus of an atom.

2. How do excited electrons behave?

Excited electrons behave differently depending on the type of energy they have absorbed. They may emit light, transfer energy to other particles, or return to their original energy level by releasing the excess energy as heat.

3. What is the significance of excited electrons in chemical reactions?

Excited electrons play a crucial role in chemical reactions as they determine the reactivity and stability of atoms and molecules. The transfer of excited electrons between atoms can result in the formation of new chemical bonds and the creation of new substances.

4. Can excited electrons be observed?

Yes, excited electrons can be observed through various techniques such as spectroscopy, which measures the energy emitted or absorbed by electrons. They can also be visualized through electron microscopy, where a beam of electrons is used to create an image of a sample.

5. How do scientists study the behaviour of excited electrons?

Scientists use various techniques and instruments to study the behaviour of excited electrons, such as X-ray crystallography, electron microscopy, and spectroscopy. These methods provide valuable information about the energy levels and movements of electrons, helping us understand their behaviour in different environments and reactions.

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