Are Recent Volcanic and Seismic Activities in Italy Interconnected?

  • Thread starter fresh_42
  • Start date
In summary: Based off of this conversation, I would say that the activity at Stromboli is more intense than usual, but it's not dangerous. The activity near the Phlegraean Fields is not as intense, but it's still an issue.
  • #1
fresh_42
Mentor
Insights Author
2023 Award
19,044
24,109
TL;DR Summary
How far away is safe?
Stromboli had a big eruption and more activity than usual this week. Stromboli is roughly 200 miles apart from the Phlegraean Fields. I ask myself
  1. Is it a good sign that geological activities are nearby such that tensions decrease?
  2. Is it safe to say that both locations are independent of each other as they are 200 miles apart?
  3. Is it especially dangerous because the impacts are getting closer?
 
Earth sciences news on Phys.org
  • #2
INGV reported that activity at Stromboli had been more intense in the past two weeks with a large explosion on 29 September, short-lived lava overflows of the craters during 3-4 October, and collapses with pyroclastic flows and lava flows on 9 October. At 1524 on 29 September an explosion at vent N2 in Area N (North Crater area) generated an ash plume that rose 300 m above the summit and ejected abundant lava fragments, lapilli, and bombs along the Sciara del Fuoco. Activity during 3-9 October generally consisted of ongoing explosions from three vents in Area N and at least two vents in Area C-S (South-Central Crater area). Low-intensity explosions from the N1 vent (Area N) ejected bombs and lapilli 80-150 m high every 10-20 minutes. Explosions ejecting coarse material, along with sometimes intense spattering, occurred at two N2 vents. Explosions from at least two vents in Area C-S, which were not visible due to the camera views, ejected ash and coarse material less than 150 m above the vent at a rate of 1-6 events per hour. At 1108 on 3 October a fissure opened on the outer flank of N2, within the Sciara del Fuoco, and produced a lava flow that traveled to the coast; the flow was cooling by 1800. At 1107 the next morning, 4 October, lava overflowed the N crater (likely N2) and unconsolidated lava rolled down the upper part of the Sciara del Fuoco.

Activity again intensified on 9 October beginning at 0921 when lava overflowed from an area in the N part of N2 and lava effused from the fissure that had opened on 3 October. At 0922 the rim of N2 collapsed and generated a pyroclastic flow that traveled down the Sciara del Fuoco, reached the sea within 30 seconds, and advanced over the water for a few hundred meters. Immediately afterwards a large amount of lava flowed down the Sciara del Fuoco in two main branches and reached the coast within a few minutes. Lava continued to flow to the coast during the rest of the day. The Dipartimento della Protezione Civile raised the Alert Level to Orange (the second highest level on a four-color scale). Collapses of material in the Sciara del Fuoco continued overnight, possibly due to erosion of the channels from lava flows. By 0919 on 10 October lava flows were only reaching part way down the Sciara del Fuoco, stopping about 400 m from the coast. Lava flows continued to stop part way down the flank during 10-12 October. Frequent collapses of material in the channel eroded by the lava flow and material from the lava flow itself descended to the coast. Spattering from Area N was visible.
https://volcano.si.edu/showreport.cfm?wvar=GVP.WVAR20221005-211040
 
  • #3
Yes, but the Stromboli is more or less no big deal. What does it say about the nearby (200 miles) giant magma chamber beneath the Phlegraean Fields?

Edit: Especially as the Phlegraean Fields themselves have a record of smoothly increasing activities within the last couple of years,
 
  • #4
  • Informative
Likes fresh_42
  • #5

Slab narrowing in the Central Mediterranean: the Calabro-Ionian subduction zone as imaged by high resolution seismic tomography​

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-23543-8

If eruptions of the volcanoes in the region have increased, along with seismic activity, then perhaps 'something' is happening.

A paper from 2010 - https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1029/2009TC002599 - describing some of the same area.I believe that Etna is part of the same system, and Etna has had activity recently.
https://www.volcanodiscovery.com/etna/current-activity.html
https://volcano.si.edu/showreport.cfm?wvar=GVP.WVAR20220615-211060
 
Last edited:

Related to Are Recent Volcanic and Seismic Activities in Italy Interconnected?

1. What are super plumes and how do they relate to earthquakes?

Super plumes are large, hot upwellings of mantle material that can rise up to 1,800 miles beneath the Earth's surface. They are thought to be responsible for the formation of many volcanic hotspots and can also trigger earthquakes due to their movement and pressure on surrounding tectonic plates.

2. How common are earthquakes near super plumes?

Earthquakes near super plumes are not as common as those near plate boundaries, but they do occur. The frequency of earthquakes near super plumes depends on the location and activity of the specific plume.

3. Can super plumes cause major earthquakes?

Yes, super plumes can cause major earthquakes. In fact, some of the largest and most destructive earthquakes in history have been linked to super plumes, such as the 2004 Sumatra earthquake and the 2011 Tohoku earthquake in Japan.

4. How do scientists study earthquakes near super plumes?

Scientists use a variety of methods to study earthquakes near super plumes, including seismology, geodesy, and geochemistry. These methods allow them to monitor seismic activity, measure changes in the Earth's surface, and analyze the composition of rocks and gases to better understand the dynamics of super plumes and their relationship to earthquakes.

5. Can we predict earthquakes near super plumes?

Unfortunately, we cannot predict earthquakes with complete accuracy, including those near super plumes. However, ongoing research and advancements in technology have allowed scientists to better understand the behavior of super plumes and their potential to trigger earthquakes, which may lead to improved forecasting and warning systems in the future.

Similar threads

Replies
0
Views
1K
Replies
6
Views
2K
Replies
2
Views
1K
  • Sci-Fi Writing and World Building
Replies
21
Views
1K
  • Sci-Fi Writing and World Building
Replies
2
Views
2K
  • Sci-Fi Writing and World Building
Replies
6
Views
2K
  • Sci-Fi Writing and World Building
Replies
1
Views
3K
  • Sci-Fi Writing and World Building
Replies
2
Views
2K
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
2
Views
4K
  • Earth Sciences
Replies
10
Views
8K
Back
Top