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Physics B.S. physics grad looking for post-college ideas

  1. Dec 25, 2017 #1
    Hi everyone,

    Thanks for taking the time to read my post. So as I stated above, I will be graduating with my BS in physics this coming fall. My GPA will be about a 2.5/2.6 upon graduation. I come from a respected big ten school so I know the name alone will help me a slight amount. But as for my direction after graduation, I'm not sure what I can do. Graduate school probably isn't an option.

    Some of the thoughts I've had are to go into IT in the short term and work my way into management. Another option is private school teaching down south. My last option, and easily my favorite, going into computer hardware engineering. I love working with computers and seeing quantum computers just around the corner, I feel like that's a job where I could do quite well. My issue here is, does my degree qualify me for such a position? I know some python and will be picking up some java, but that is the extent of my programming knowledge. I also build computers in my spare time. Plus I currently have a job in biophysics research.

    So any ideas, concerns, thoughts, would be happily accepted. Thanks!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 25, 2017 #2
    Hi everyone,

    Thanks for looking at my post. As I said above, I am going to b graduating soon (after fall 2018) with a 2.5 GPA from a big university with a respected physics program. I have found that not only is graduate school not an option, it's not something I want anyway, but I am,not opposed to getting a second bachelor's degree.

    Some extra background on me, I have some skills in python and will be picking up java soon. I also build desktop computers in my spare time. Besides that, I have been working in a biophysics research lab conducting tests for the past 4 months and plan on continuing there until I graduate.

    Here are some of my thoughts on what I would like to do. One idea that I had would be to go into IT for some insurance company then work my way into management. My second idea would be to teach physics and upper level math in a private school in the southern half of the US. My third idea, which is my favorite, but probably most unlikely, is computer hardware engineering. I'm not sure if my degree qualifies me for a position like this, but I'm regretting not majoring in computer science or electrical engineering now.

    If anyone has any input, recommendations, or suggestions, I would like to hear them.

    Feel free to be blunt, I'm a rare millienial who can take criticism haha.
     
  4. Dec 25, 2017 #3
    Hi everyone,

    I was curious if there were any computer hardware engineers out there that could help an undergrad physics major get into the field. I'm looking for recommendations on what skills to have, good places to break into the field at, second degrees, or certifications that employers are looking for.

    Thanks!
     
  5. Dec 25, 2017 #4
    Hi everyone,

    I'm currently an undergraduate senior in physics with a 2.5 gpa looking to go into the computer hardware engineering field and was looking for help as to where I should go and what I should do to make this a reality.

    Thanks!
     
  6. Dec 25, 2017 #5

    Delta²

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    I think you definitely need to do a Masters in EE(Electric Engineering) after you finish your physics major. Masters will probably take another 1-2 years of studies.
     
  7. Dec 25, 2017 #6

    bhobba

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    Depends on where you live. In Australia its 2-3 years.

    These days, in Aus anyway, schools are moving to engineering being a Masters. Its normally 3 years, but depending on what you do undergrad it can be just two.

    Thanks
    Bill
     
  8. Dec 25, 2017 #7

    Vanadium 50

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    How does he get into a MSEE program without a BSEE and with a 2.5 GPA?
     
  9. Dec 25, 2017 #8

    Delta²

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    Good question... I don't think a BSEE is an absolute necessity for a MSEE. But his/her GPA score is kind of low that's true, won't be easy to accept him for a MSEE but there are always opportunities here and there...
     
  10. Dec 25, 2017 #9

    Vanadium 50

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    No, there are not always opportunities here and there. Some people, sad to say., are just not going to be able to get in anywhere. But why are you pushing the OP towards graduate school anyway? He himself says it's not in the cards and not what he wants. Couple that with the difficulty of switching fields, why do you think this is the right choice?
     
  11. Dec 25, 2017 #10

    Delta²

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    Well ok maybe you are right on this.
    I didn't read all of his posts, I think he posted many threads in many subforums, an admin probably gathered all the posts in one thread. I just read the thread where he had only post #3.
    He just says he loves computer hardware engineering, I think if he can enter SOMEHOW in a MSEE program would be the best for him, even if he has to spent another 2 years of studies for it.
     
  12. Dec 25, 2017 #11
    Yeah, thanks guys. As for graduate school, there's maybe some low end places that have a super low end chance of accepting me. But i would not go into grad school for physics. I see so many of my graduate counterparts and just do not like the large amount of research they do. Plus, in all honesty, I know i am not as proficient in math as my fellow undergrads. I still got a 100% in differential equations, but the rest of calculus was a struggle.
     
  13. Dec 25, 2017 #12
    Most likely you gotta earn a living somehow, and with your background, I'll bet that programming and teaching are probably the most promising opportunities. When you think teaching, you may also be aware that there are a number of public school systems in the south with under supply of physics and math teachers, so you can often start teaching with a BS in math or physics and get into a special program to get certified within a few years. The pay often is not that great, but it is a start, and once you earn a certification and have some experience, then you can move up in pay if you want to higher paying opportunities. But any way you slice it, you're teaching job options are much broader if you include both math and physics in your target jobs, AND if you include both public and private opportunities.
     
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