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Basic question on recrystallization.

  1. Sep 30, 2008 #1
    I have a quick question:
    Suppose that you observed a solid melting at 150 degrees - 160 degrees Celsius. Once it is recrystallized, the observed melting point drops to 145-145.5 degrees Celsius. How can this be?

    At first, I thought it was due to an impurity, which would act to lower the melting point. However, the melting point of the recrystallized solid is very narrow, so it is probably quite pure. Then again, the recrystallized mixture might be eutectic, which would explain the sharp melting point. But then again... How is it possible to contaminate a sample that badly?

    Any help is appreciated.
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 30, 2008 #2


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    Reaction with solvent?
  4. Sep 30, 2008 #3


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    Perhaps during the measurement of the first melting point, the sample was heated too quickly so that melting wasn't observed until the chamber was at a temperature higher than the real melting point.
  5. Sep 30, 2008 #4


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    I'm not an expert on this topic however your last assumption is probably correct , you have have simply altered the original composition so that the mixture is closer to the eutectic composition. What are you working with?
  6. Oct 1, 2008 #5
    It's not real data. Rather, it's just a question I have to answer and attach to my lab.
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