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Basic question: Propagator of a scalar boson

  1. Mar 10, 2015 #1
    I have a question that is very basic and could not seem to find it online or I have not searched the right way. What is the propagator of a scalar boson? I found that of a fermion line and that of a vector boson but could not find that of a scalar boson.
     
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  3. Mar 10, 2015 #2

    Orodruin

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    Scalar propagators are usually the first to be discussed in any textbook and it is usually taken as the first example because it is free from the finer details in fermion or vector boson propagators. Try http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Propagator to start with.
     
  4. Mar 10, 2015 #3
    But the very section that contains scalar propagator does not practically have it written there.
     
  5. Mar 10, 2015 #4

    ChrisVer

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    The propagator is written:

    [itex] \sim \frac{1}{k^2 - m^2}[/itex]

    In momentum space.
     
  6. Mar 10, 2015 #5

    Orodruin

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    It contains a long discussion about which propagator is the correct one from a causality point of view and it is written explicitly several times and in different representations. Perhaps the confusion stems from not being used to seeing propagators as what they really are, i.e., Green's functions of the free theory? This is all discussed under "relativistic propagators".
     
  7. Mar 10, 2015 #6
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