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Being in Physics and Math double major

  1. Particles and Fields

    35.7%
  2. Nuclear Physics

    7.1%
  3. Optics

    7.1%
  4. Condensed Matter Physics

    14.3%
  5. Chemical Physics

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  6. Applied Physics

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  7. Astrophysics

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  8. Low Temperature Physics

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  9. Medical, Health Physics

    28.6%
  10. Electromagnetism

    7.1%
  1. Jun 10, 2012 #1
    Hello Again.

    I am new to the forum and this is actually the 2nd time ive asked a question. I wanted to get some insight into what Physics Majors that minor in math have the possibility of doing in the carrer world. I should note that I am in college pursuing my undergraduate degree in these fields. Upon completion I want to get an Masters in a High Energy or Applied Physics program. I have looked up different things online concerning this. I just wanted to see what some more defined people in the field would consider. Not to step on anyone's toes but education is not really an interest of mine. What fields and companies that have a demand for graduates in my program would also be appreciated. Mention of relevant and realistic salaries would also be appreciated.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 11, 2012 #2
    I put medicinal/health physics but I really mean biophysics.
     
  4. Jun 12, 2012 #3
    Thanks for replying . Please encourage others to answer back to my question and post. By the way, why Biophysics?? I have read a scarce amount about it.
     
  5. Jun 12, 2012 #4
    There's a lot of money in anything bio.
     
  6. Jun 15, 2012 #5
    Hey is there any way for my post to be put on the forum so that more people can answer and comment on it .
     
  7. Jun 15, 2012 #6

    Choppy

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Education Advisor

    Next time you may want to try giving your post a title that is more relevant to the quesion you are asking. From your title, one would suspect that your question has something to do with double majoring in math and physics rather than the the most lucrative field of physics.

    Also, while I think I understand what you're getting at, this is a very difficult question to actually answer when you start to think about it. Are you talking about job opportunities for graduates? Job opportunities within the particular field? Earning potential with a graduate degree in a particular field?

    Medical physics, for example, tends to have relatively high salaries. But it's not just an academic specialty. Medical physics is a recognized profession. The same could be said for geophysics. If you were to look at astropysics then, there really isn't a corresponding profession associated with it outside of academia. That doesn't mean however that someone with a PhD in astrophysics couldn't go out and get a job in finance or in the defence sector or even in medical physics (after some hoop-jumping)and end up with a very comfortable salary.
     
  8. Jun 15, 2012 #7
    For medical physics, how "high" are we talking?
     
  9. Jun 15, 2012 #8
    Everyone who is answering particles and fields is pulling your leg. Seriously. Applied physics and medical physics are the most employable areas right now.
     
  10. Jun 15, 2012 #9
    No love for plasma physics?
     
  11. Jun 15, 2012 #10

    Choppy

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    Education Advisor

    I always hesitate to give out numbers on this becase it's quite variable. If you're a student, I would recommend becoming a member of the AAPM for access to their annual salary surveys. That way you'll have what is likely the most reliable data on the matter.

    For ballpark you're looking at less than most physicians and more than most engineers.
     
  12. Jun 17, 2012 #11
    lol but apparently everyone that does particles and fields becomes a high rolling quant at an investment bank... or so the legend goes...
     
  13. Jun 19, 2012 #12
    Re: (Most Lucrative Physics Fields Survey) & Physics and Math double major

    "Also, while I think I understand what you're getting at, this is a very difficult question to actually answer when you start to think about it. Are you talking about job opportunities for graduates? Job opportunities within the particular field? Earning potential with a graduate degree in a particular field?"



    You have a point choppy. I am talking about job opportunities for graduates in the particular master degree fields listed in my survey. The earning potential for each of these fields is also appreciated as it will help me assess which ones are the more lucrative. Also I want to do a graduate physics degree that is more experimental and hands on versus the ones that are mainly academic (ie. don't have much usage in industry).

    I will also take your survey advice choppy and on the AAPM * what does it mean by the way?
     
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