Best European Universities in Physics?

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  • Thread starter Gendo
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  • #1
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I realize this forum is mostly US focused, but i'd like to know some good european universities in physics.
I'd also like to know which areas are more lucrative and/or have more job opportunities.
Thanks ^^
 

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  • #2
cristo
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Where specifically in Europe are you thinking about?
 
  • #3
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Mainly the UK, Germany, France, Netherlands and such. Im hoping for some courses lectured in english because i dont' really speak german or french.
 
  • #4
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Are you looking undergrad or graduate studies?
I would be interested to hear some info about US students going abroad for graduate studies
In the UK obviously there's Cambridge and Oxford
In France I think there's L'École Polytechnique (I think I remember reading that some famous people have taught and studied there)
 
  • #5
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Im thinking about Masters studies mostly. The main reason is that most undergraduate courses are usually taught in the country's native language. I'm also trying to ignore the most obvious english universities (Oxford, Cambridge and the Imperial) which are rather expensive. More specifically, I'd really like to know the best european courses in medical physics. Apreciate the input ^^
 
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  • #6
cristo
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I'll help you with the UK universities, since I know nothing about the others! Next it depends on what specifically you want to study in your masters degree. Different universities offer different topics for masters degrees.

Also, with respect to fees, I presume that you are not an EU national, and so will have to pay international fees? If so, they will range from about £13k to £16k for the year. Note that, currently, Imperial's fees are £15.8k for a physics masters.
 
  • #7
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I'm portuguese by the way (hence EU ).
 
  • #8
cristo
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I'm portuguese by the way (hence EU ).

Well, then, you get to pay "home" fees, which are around £3000 at all universities. I see you've added that you want to study Medical Physics. That is way out of my field, and so I don't know which places do it. You might want to google search for "medical physics msc uk" or something like that. Post back anything you may find, and I'll perhaps be able to help in pointing out which are the "better" universities.
 
  • #9
J77
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For medical physics/engineering, you want to check out which universities are connected with local hospitals.

eg. I know that Bristol uni does work with the BRI (Bristol Royal Infirmary) -- a good uni + a good hospital must equal a "Best" qualification.

(I would imagine that the London unis have strong connections to big hospitals too.)
 
  • #10
MathematicalPhysicist
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cristo, concerning the fees, if i have a british passport but live in israel, am i still considered an international student for the fees?
 
  • #12
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well, i don't know, cause i got my british passport from my dad, but basically im an israeli citizen who has british passport, i don't know if that makes me a "national", but it would be nice for me if that were the case, cause the internatinal fees are quite intimidating (not that the 3k pounds sounds any good, but if you go to graduate studies you get a TA scholarship, or also this is questionable and not always offered to everyone who goes to graduate studies?).
 
  • #13
cristo
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well, i don't know, cause i got my british passport from my dad, but basically im an israeli citizen who has british passport, i don't know if that makes me a "national", but it would be nice for me if that were the case,
You'll have to check whether you count as a national or not. I personally don't really know.
but if you go to graduate studies you get a TA scholarship, or also this is questionable and not always offered to everyone who goes to graduate studies?).
There's no such thing as a TA scholarships over here. There are studentships available whic basically pay your (home rate) fees and give you a monthly stipend on which to live, however you do not need to do any teaching. (And, in fact, any teaching you do will be paid on top of your stipend). These studentships are only available to people paying home fees though (I think).
 
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  • #15
mgb_phys
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UCL used to do medical physics when I was there.
Remember that living expenses in London will be about twice as much as the north of England (Durham, Newcastle) or Scotland.

The universities make most of their money from overseas fees so they will try and class you as an international student if they possibly can.
UK PhDs are a lot more concentrated than in the US. You may be able to do some tutorials or lab demonstrating but not enough to live on.
 
  • #16
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So how do you stay alive long enough to get your Ph.D. in the UK?
 
  • #17
J77
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So how do you stay alive long enough to get your Ph.D. in the UK?
You can finish a PhD in 3 years. During that time you get funding from a research council of about 10-12k gbp per annum (double it for $). You also get teaching duties (a la TA) which bring you in another 3-6k. This is all tax-free!

You can easily live on this anywhere outside of London -- or inside if you don't mind living like a student still :smile:

The universities make most of their money from overseas fees so they will try and class you as an international student if they possibly can.
Only some parts of the uni will try to make money like that -- the ones who look after the finances. If you get in with a good supervisor, they should try to make your life as easy as possible; ie. not try to make money out of you.
 
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  • #18
MathematicalPhysicist
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Here's something I found from the university of manchester which may help: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/postgraduate/fees/whichfees/
well the first question iv'e already answered, the second as i said i live at israel from infancy, for the third question because i havent lived in EU/UK i cannot answer it.


well i guess when the time will come ill ask for those forms which i guess every uk univ has, and then decide upon this.
 
  • #19
J77
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Best people to ask for these kind of (passport/nationality) questions are the embassies -- that's what they're there for and they're usually extremely willing to help.
 
  • #20
cristo
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You can finish a PhD in 3 years. During that time you get funding from a research council of about 10-12k gbp per annum (double it for $).
12-15k nowadays; the latter being the London stipend. And you're right, it is quite hard to live in london on that without being a student!
 

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