Beta-Voltalics Output: Radiation & Silicon Requirements

In summary: Beta-voltaics is a technology that uses beta particles to convert energy into electrical power. The activity of the beta particles is proportional to the number of atoms of radionuclide present, and the decay constant determines how active the beta particles are. This technology is used in a number of applications, including power generation and in-space propulsion. Unfortunately, the beta spectrum has some disadvantages, such as the inability to capture all of the beta particles, and the need to size the device based on the peak of the beta energy spectrum.
  • #1
Seth T
4
0
Does anyone know what the output is like from beta-voltalics? And how much radiation is needed and how much silicon?
Thank you in advance.
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
What is "beta-voltalics"?

It is not often that Google returns no listing.

Zz.
 
  • #3
A beta emitting isotope surrounded by basically a bunch of diodes. The beta particles put a charge into the silicon similarly to how light interacts with solar cells. I think.
 
  • #4
Seth T said:
A beta emitting isotope surrounded by basically a bunch of diodes. The beta particles put a charge into the silicon similarly to how light interacts with solar cells. I think.

No kidding! Do you have a reference that describes this device?

It would be a rather "strange" device considering that this isn't a very good way to treat silicon.

Zz.
 
  • #5
I heard about it from a nuclear engineer from a power plant. I can't contact him right now as they are in shut-down. But I think that NASA used it some.
 
  • #6
Well, we have nuclear engineers here, so let's wait to hear from them as well.

Zz.
 
  • #7
NASA has used thermionics and thermoelectrics, but I've not heard of a major application of beta voltaics. Someone might be confusing technologies.

OK - there's a bit on alpha and beta voltaics at NASA Glenn.

Power & In-Space Propulsion
http://www.grc.nasa.gov/WWW/5000/pep/photo-space/

The problem of beta-voltaics is the spectrum of beta particles, and the gammas, and the decrease of activity with time. The activity is proportional to the number of atoms of radionuclide present and the decay constant. The greater the decay constant, the greater the activity for an amount of radionuclide, but that means it decays more rapidly.

Basically in beta-voltaics, there is a collector collecting the beta particles, so the source is at a + charge, which causes a potential difference across which a load is placed. There is a disadvantage with the beta spectrum such that some betas don't make it out of the source material, so the dimensions have to be properly sized based on the peak of the beta energy spectrum.
 
Last edited:
  • #8
I know about thermoelectrics, but I think that this was something different.
 
  • #9
Last edited by a moderator:

Related to Beta-Voltalics Output: Radiation & Silicon Requirements

1. What is Beta-Voltalics Output?

Beta-Voltalics Output is a type of radiation that is produced by unstable atomic nuclei. It is also known as beta radiation or beta particles.

2. How does Beta-Voltalics Output affect living organisms?

Beta-Voltalics Output can cause damage to living organisms by disrupting cells and DNA. Exposure to high levels of this radiation can lead to various health issues, including cancer.

3. What are the Silicon Requirements for Beta-Voltalics Output detection?

Silicon is commonly used in the detection of Beta-Voltalics Output because of its ability to convert the radiation into electrical signals. The thickness and purity of the silicon are important factors in its effectiveness for detecting this type of radiation.

4. How is Beta-Voltalics Output measured?

Beta-Voltalics Output is typically measured using a Geiger counter or a scintillation counter. These devices detect the radiation and convert it into audible or visual signals that can be measured and recorded.

5. What safety precautions should be taken when working with Beta-Voltalics Output?

When working with Beta-Voltalics Output, it is important to wear protective gear, such as gloves and lab coats, to minimize exposure. Proper ventilation and shielding should also be in place to prevent overexposure to the radiation. It is also essential to follow proper handling and disposal procedures to avoid contamination.

Similar threads

  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
3
Views
1K
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
6
Views
2K
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
15
Views
2K
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
1
Views
1K
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
2
Replies
49
Views
6K
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
32
Views
2K
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
21
Views
1K
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
1
Views
500
  • Atomic and Condensed Matter
Replies
0
Views
1K
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
9
Views
3K
Back
Top