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Black Hole - Dark Energy and Matter Question

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  1. Jun 25, 2012 #1
    My Vision of a Black Hole,

    Two questions at the bottom about Gravity and Dark Energy

    When most Black Hole are created from a hyper nova, they begin their life as a quasar, shooting out unwanted gas from core as its overloaded with matter.

    When a black hole is created, and because of the manner in which it collapses this would create a massive and sudden pull in the very fabrics of space time itself - similar to dropping a large bolder in the ocean, there would be a massive hole and a wave, and then the water would quickly rush back to the centre to fill the void created by the impact.

    This would create a rush of un-wanted matter towards the Black Hole, this matter can and will be pulled in at its equator (event horizon) and ejected at its poles, which would explain the quasars of a newly formed black hole forming a new galaxy.

    Because of the sudden impact on the surrounding regions of the very fabrics of space and the gravitational pull from a new born Black Hole and a newly created gravitational centre for the gas and surrounding stars, this may explain the spinning and rotational shape and arms seen in most galaxies, yet the galaxies don't continue to spin later in life when the quasar has receded.


    Question 1
    Isn't it possible that past the event horizon of a Black Hole that gravity returns to a state of force and not pull, because at, and up to the event horizon gravity itself would become a victim of the Black Hole - and that there may be a point of an equal gravitational force just a little further out across the galaxy - but the same gravitational force at the inner and outer points of a galaxy, and a force that continues far beyond each galaxy, and could that explain the sync rotation, and the initial rotation resides because of the inertia created from the creation of a Black Hole?

    Question 2
    If the above answer is a definite no, and you need to add six times more matter into the equation in the form of a dark matter to balance out the gravitational spin of a galaxy, would i be right in saying that a proton has matter? and has anybody been able to calculate the amount of matter created by all the stars in the form of light (protons) in any given galaxies?
    If a proton does have matter, that's a lot of matter that could be in fact the supposable dark matter they are looking for right? and as a galaxy matures it has a lot more stars, light and protons.

    Id love if someone could answer these questions, as they have being floating around in my head for many years.

    Eddy
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 25, 2012 #2

    Bobbywhy

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    Gold Member

    Eddyb1, Welcome to Physics Forums!

    You did not read the Rules before you posted your "questions". Just click on "Rules" at the top of this page. In truth, your questions amount to the expression of "Personal theories or speculations that go beyond or counter to generally-accepted science". These are prohibited here.

    Your post shows you've been doing some reading about Astrophysics and Cosmology. Also, it shows you have some large misunderstandings. For example, your Question No. 1 makes no sense at all: "...and that there may be a point of an equal gravitational force just a little further out across the galaxy - but the same gravitational force at the inner and outer points of a galaxy, and a force that continues far beyond each galaxy, and could that explain the sync rotation, and the initial rotation resides because of the inertia created from the creation of a Black Hole?"

    Question No. 2: "...would i be right in saying that a proton has matter?" Protons ARE matter, and they have some mass. Is that what you really meant to say? "and has anybody been able to calculate the amount of matter created by all the stars in the form of light (protons) in any given galaxies?" Stars do not create matter. Light emitted by stars does not consist of protons.

    Eddyb1, I do not want you to get turned off by this. You show a strong interest in these subjects and the intelligence to learn them correctly. May I suggest you try a new approach to satisfy your curiosity? Take "baby steps"...by that I mean, concentrate on one subject at a time, making sure you have learned each process and the terminology correctly. You have passed over Quasars, Black Holes, event horizons, Spiral Galaxy formation, proton mass, and dark matter to name just a few subjects you've included in your post. Any one of those subjects is enough for some PhD in Astrophysics to spend a lifetime learning about.
     
  4. Jun 26, 2012 #3
    Hi Bobbywhy,

    Re-reading my post carefully and with a clear mind, I would have to agree with you a 100% on all your statements. I will in fact I'll go back to the start - read the forum rules and then take baby steps to understanding and learning what I need answered.

    My sincere apologies to everyone in the forum, and if admin wishes to remove my post please don't hesitate to do so.

    Thank you
     
  5. Jun 26, 2012 #4

    Bobbywhy

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    Gold Member

    Don't forget, here at PF members are always ready to help others along on their journey towards understanding Nature. When you have some doubt or question, come right back here and ask away!

    Cheers,
    Bobbywhy
     
  6. Jun 27, 2012 #5
    What if there was a special forum for people to post their wild-eyed personal theories? Maybe people would go there first and avoid embarrassment. (I learned the hard way)
     
  7. Jun 27, 2012 #6
    Yep - mightn't be a bad idea. It would let people get a load of their chest, and could make some interesting reads - I bet it would get a loads of traffic.

    And you never know, somebody out their might be on to something simple that everyone else over looked.
     
  8. Jun 27, 2012 #7

    Drakkith

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    Staff: Mentor

    No, a quasar is different from a normal black hole. It is a highly energetic galactic nucleus. Most black holes are not quasars.

    The mass that the black hole has after creation already exists as the mass of the core of the star. While I'm not sure of the gravitational waves created by the formation of a black hole, I can assure you that it is not a sudden pull like dropping a boulder in the ocean. Spacetime is not water and will not rush back into this "void", which doesn't exist anyways.
    The formation of a quasar is not well understood, but it is definitely not from the collapse of a single star. It is also not known whether a galaxy forms first or if the supermassive black hole forms first.

    All galaxies have some sort of spin. In irregular galaxies the motion of the stars is not in one direction like the arms of spiral galaxies, but the stars and matter are still in motion.

    No, nothing here fits with our current understanding of gravity, black holes, or galaxies. Gravity is the curvature of spacetime, so it isn't "sucked" into a black hole at all, as there is nothing that can fall in.

    It would be spammed with nonsense and would be pretty much useless. Effectively 100% of personal theories are completely nonsensical because the creators of the theory have no knowledge of what we already know, how it fits together, and why we know what we know.
     
  9. Jun 27, 2012 #8

    phinds

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    2016 Award

    You misunderstand the charter of this forum, which is mainstream science, not nonsense. PLUS, as Drakith said, it's a terrible idea for obvious reasons.

    There are plenty of crackpot forums on the internet. This just isn't one of them.
     
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