1. Limited time only! Sign up for a free 30min personal tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Books about the foundations of mathematics

  1. Jul 21, 2012 #1
    Hello,

    Does anyone know of any good books that covers the foundations of mathematics (i.e. mathematical logic, axiomatic set theory, proof theory, model theory, type theory, recursion theory...)?

    Keeping in mind that I'm still in high school. (Although I'm taking math courses at my local university.)

    EDIT: Should this be in: "Math & Science Learning Materials"? Mod can move it if he/she thinks so... (This is my first post...)
     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2012
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 21, 2012 #2

    micromass

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Education Advisor
    2016 Award

    For axiomatic set theory, an extremely good introduction is "Introduction to Set theory" by Hrbacek and Jech: https://www.amazon.com/Introduction-Edition-Revised-Expanded-Mathematics/dp/0824779150

    A good book on mathematical logic is "Mathematical logic" by Ebbinghaus: https://www.amazon.com/Mathematical...=1342905870&sr=1-1-spell&keywords=Ebbingshaus
    This may be hard for a beginner though, so check it out before buying.

    A good introductory book on logic is "A mathematical introduction to logic" from Enderton: https://www.amazon.com/Mathematical...=UTF8&qid=1342906030&sr=1-1&keywords=Enderton
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 6, 2017
  4. Jul 21, 2012 #3

    atyy

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    I'm in the middle of Robert Wolf's A Tour Through Mathematical Logic. It's so far beautifully written and accessible.
     
  5. Jul 23, 2012 #4
    Thanks for the suggestions!
     
  6. Jul 25, 2012 #5
    Bourbaki's 'Theory of Sets' covers some of that and is quite a nice book to go through.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook