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Foundations Books on mathematical logic, foundations, and philosophy

  1. Jun 26, 2017 #1
    Hello, all. I am looking for some good books to start becoming invested in mathematical logic, the foundations of the field of mathematics, and also basically in general the philosophical heart of this wide subject which has interested me greatly. Now I have already read Shoenfield and Halmos and I already have books on Set/Category theory but I am specifically looking for something that's somewhat like the bible of mathematical logic. Anyone have suggestions?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 26, 2017 #2

    fresh_42

    Staff: Mentor

    I doubt that such a work exists, as there is no single mathematical logic. What usually is referred to as "mathematical logic" is the first order predicate calculus. But there are others. There are even systems with three possible values of truth. As you explicitly mentioned philosophy, the book from Charles (Karl) Popper "The Logic of Scientific Discovery" could be of interest to you. Other relevant scientists are Bertrand Russell and Kurt Gödel. Also of interest could be historical essays about the first half of the 20th century in general (foundational crises), and especially a reflection on Hilbert's program.

    I know this might not answer your question with respect to a standard opus, but it hopefully guides you towards possible directions. The Wikipedia articles usually have lists of links, where one can start with research, e.g. on the original papers.
     
  4. Jun 26, 2017 #3
    I was looking for something that has a lot of material at least suitable enough for one to hold a strong foundation in the subject.

    Thanks for your assistance either way.
     
  5. Jun 26, 2017 #4
  6. Jun 26, 2017 #5
    It enough to make my brain bleeds but its good. I included something of the contents.
    1498502080959.jpeg
    1498502156970.jpeg 1498502210064.jpeg
     
  7. Jun 26, 2017 #6
    How about this one ?

    fromabook.png
     
  8. Jun 26, 2017 #7

    fresh_42

    Staff: Mentor

    How is any of these related to logic? Except that hopefully it's used.
    Algebra on high school level.
    Physics. Neihter logic nor foundational nor philosophy.
    History of a certain aspect of physics. Not even close to what the OP described.
     
  9. Jun 26, 2017 #8

    Mark44

    Staff: Mentor

  10. Jun 26, 2017 #9
  11. Jun 26, 2017 #10
    I believe that the work, and overview of the history (and an in depth working of said mathmatics)of pythagoreans and euclid would but rather apt to the Ops request. I thought ancient mathmatics and how it relates to and birthed modern mathmatics would also be pretty foundational. Mathmatics is covered first,then the physics comes en masse. He need not read it all.

    The are pages devoted to nothing but equations and proofs along with questions to test understanding.
     
  12. Jun 26, 2017 #11

    fresh_42

    Staff: Mentor

    This might be true or not, but it has definitely not the least to do with
    Penrose might be entertaining, but he's certainly not the first choice, when it comes to textbooks, and none if mathematical logic is the purpose.

    And by the way: "field" in this context does not refer to the algebraic object called field, as
    would suggest.
     
  13. Jun 26, 2017 #12
    Lol. I am already past Abstract/Commutative Algebra. Anyways if anyone knows of Barwise's handbook of mathematical logic, which I have not read and of course will not be able to read due to the fact it's extremely difficult to find and I don't have the money to purchase available copies. However, is there anyone who knows a book like it?
     
  14. Jun 27, 2017 #13
  15. Jun 27, 2017 #14
    Just a question, provided one has read Hartshorne, Griffiths/Harris, and also Liu's Arithmetic curves; and also I have EGA and SGA set to be completely read(too bad they will most likely never be translated); which book do you recommend for Algebraic Geometry after all this or just in general as a complement?
     
  16. Jun 27, 2017 #15

    fresh_42

    Staff: Mentor

    Not really easy to add something upon these. What you're looking for that Grothendiek and Dieudonné haven't addressed? I know of some interesting papers by V. Strassen (Rank and optimal computation of generic tensors, 1982) and others, e.g. on lower bounds of matrix multiplication which uses methods of algebraic geometry (http://www.math.tamu.edu/~jml/LOsecbnd05-28.pdf), and an interesting essay (free download, https://arxiv.org/pdf/1205.5935.pdf, 92 p.) about geometric algebra (which of course is different from algebraic geometry).

    @mathwonk once recommended some:
    and @lavinia
    Maybe not exactly what you've been looking for, but judging by whom they have been recommended, worth to keep in mind in any case.
     
  17. Jun 27, 2017 #16
    Well do you anything close to something that's like the English translations of EGA and SGA?
     
  18. Jun 27, 2017 #17

    fresh_42

    Staff: Mentor

    Sorry, no. I assume the Bourbaki approach isn't really a bestseller. I'v seen some interesting books on the internet about the historical developments like the correspondence between Grothendiek and Serre, but no conceptional treatment. Leo Corry seems to have written a nice overview of the modern mathematical structural concepts, but this also looks more like a historical treatment:
    https://books.google.de/books?id=8G0FCAAAQBAJ&dq=Bourbaki+algebraic+geometry
     
  19. Jun 27, 2017 #18
    Does this go over similar topics as EGA/SGA?
     
  20. Jun 27, 2017 #19

    fresh_42

    Staff: Mentor

    I don't know. I only know about EGA/SGA what is written on Wiki. My assessment is based on what I know about the authors (and an old French version of a Bourbaki text about algebraic geometry I found and had a look into). But I don't think that the historical treatments I mentioned above can be compared to it. I only added them as being interesting on their own. To be honest, I cannot really imagine that a book written Bourbakian style would find many readers on the Anglo-American market. As far as I know, it is a fundamentally different tradition. And the books I have are again in another "wrong" language.
     
  21. Jun 28, 2017 #20
    For the philosophical part, maybe reading the book by Morris Kline: Mathematics in Western Culture? I have not looked at it.
     
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