Boyfriend is very homophobic. Can we make it work?

  • Thread starter Toph_fan
  • Start date
  • Tags
    Work
In summary, the person is in a relationship with a great boyfriend who is affectionate and caring, and is also responsible and family-oriented. However, their ideologies and beliefs are completely different, with the person being liberal and not religious while the boyfriend and his family hold more conservative views. They have discussed marriage and the person feels pressure to settle down. The main issue is their conflicting beliefs, especially regarding climate change and homosexuality. The person's mother does not think they will be happy in the long run, but the person believes that the boyfriend will be a wonderful father. However, they must discuss and compromise on how they will raise their children with such differing beliefs. The person also raises concerns about their boyfriend's homophobia and
  • #36


What's more important, your relationship as a whole or your views on sexual orientation?

I won't date plenty of people because I care about specific things and have no interest in being with someone who disagrees with me in these areas but this a preemptive position.
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #37


Fredrik said:
I can see why "doesn't respect your views" would pop a red flag in this case, but you're suggesting that being nice pops another red flag. That doesn't make any sense to me.

I don't know... nice is actually a rather meaningless measure of the merits of character beyond the surface. Nice mostly means they say nice things and give people things. It doesn't really mean they respect your values or are willing to engage in any kind of meaningful conversation with you. We don't use the word "nice" to describe a real philanthropist. They get much deeper words like "compassionate" and "humanitarian". We don't use "nice" to describe a passionate lover...A perfect example is the "nice guy"

http://www.wired.com/underwire/2010/05/alt-text-nice-guys-guide/

These guys aren't going to beat their girlfriends or anything, but they certainly have a warped sense of entitlement...

So I don't know.. I think we use "nice" to describe somebody this is really only "socially nice". Nice on the surface, polite... maybe only because they're a spineless coward and lack any enjoyable traits, so they have to make up with it by being nice. Of course, a philanthropist can be nice as well, and so can a passionate lover. But we usually don't use the word "nice" to describe them (even if they may be "socially nice") because they have deeper traits that are more admirable, so calling them "nice" is a disservice.
 
Last edited:
  • #38


I'm not sure whether or not I want to be with him still.

Are you a conflicted girl? Are you wondering "Is this as good as it will ever get?" Nice guy boyfriend who makes you feel as the only girl in the world. But I do not see any passion no spark. The guy is not bad enough for you - is that the problem?

In fact, quite the opposite - you seem to diss him and portray him as being wanting. It is not enduring for a good solid relationship, to have one partner critical of the emotional and intellectual aspects of the other, their beliefs and behaviorisms, as being of a lessor quality. A liberal viewpoint does not automatically make one superior. Nor correct in the getting under the skin of someone else and mis-understandings of what makes them tick. Perhaps you should do a little less of the psychological analysis because you just could be wrong.


You have not answered jackmell's riddle. It works both ways -for YOU and for him.
Then ask him to answer this riddle:

A couple, early twenties, got a one-year old and a two year old. Mom stays home all day long taking care of them while he goes to work. He comes in at 4:00p and they both give each other the same precious gift. What is it?

I do not know if you and your boyfriend can make it. You seem to rationalize why it shouldn't. Maybe you yourself should work a little bit harder on the portrayal of him in a better light. But at least this way if the relationship does not, at least there will not be any emotional repercussions on your part, since you already had suspisions that he could not change.
 
  • #39


Here's the main problem: our ideologies are completely different. I was raised in a secular household and religion has never been a part of my life. I'm liberal, I believe in climate change, I care for the environment and I'm not homophobic. He and his family are of course the opposite. My boyfriend doesn't believe in climate change and his sister has called people concerned about the environment hippies twice now. My bf thinks that climate change is just a big lie invented to make money. Both he and his sister believe that being gay is a choice and constantly make homophobic remarks. My bf even joked once that he'd break up with me if I wasn't homophobic even though he knows that I have close gay friends. I asked him once why he thought being gay was a choice and he told me that he thinks it's just a fad. I then tried to reason with him but he just ignored me and changed the topic. Also, his sister is a young Earth creationist even though she's really smart and a biology major. It just blows my mind how she can so readily disregard established scientific theories that conflict with her beliefs (such as the evidence for climate change, evolution etc). What's worse is that my boyfriend never wants to engage in friendly debates. I'm not one of those in your face debaters, I would just like to defend my position sometimes.
It's frustrating just talking with people like that, I can't imagine having a boyfriend (or girlfriend in my case) who has such radical beliefs.
People can change their opinion on those matters, but it has to be beat into them over a long period of time.

I think it's every rational minded person's duty to fight irrationality every chance they get.
I'd say if the topic comes up, you should be prepared to defend the truth. Try to change him. Don't go out of your way and bring up climate change or anything like that, but any time the topic comes up, I think you should debate it smartly and calmly, but you shouldn't just let it go.
 
  • #40


leroyjenkens said:
It's frustrating just talking with people like that, I can't imagine having a boyfriend (or girlfriend in my case) who has such radical beliefs.
People can change their opinion on those matters, but it has to be beat into them over a long period of time.

I think it's every rational minded person's duty to fight irrationality every chance they get.
.
You can say this it is being too close minded also. Rationality seem to have very little importance in personal matters like families/relationships. Personally, I find it too annoying dealing with people with very strong opinions whether they are rational or irrational.
 
  • #41


Why do you care? Unless you want to be DPed.
 
  • #42


my uncle is very racist against black people, but other than that he is one of the greatest most generous nicest people that i know, who has done so much volunteer work who helps his community. my aunt made the right choice by living with him.

so i wouldn't let one isolated trait, decide it all.
 
  • #43


Just an observation:

You guys keep babbling about how the bf doesn't respect the girl's views, but it seems to me that it's you people who don't respect the bf's homophobic views... I mean, whenever the bf was confronted by the OP about his views he shifted the topic to avoid conflict. If he didn't respect her views, he'd push his point and try to convince the girl of his viewpoint.

So stop whining to dump him because just because he doesn't want to change his apparently bad ideology.. Or making up stuff about him being a psycho posing as "overly nice". It's bad manners painting a person as 100% bad just because he holds Christian-conservative views.
 
  • #44


homophobic views aren't respectable. I could be wrong, but I'm pretty sure a strong aspect of Christian principles are love and acceptance, even to the extent of turning the other cheek when assaulted. So it's really a double standard to try and base intolerance on Christian values.
 
  • #45


Just because you're required to not be violent towards bad people (like homosexuals according to Christianity), doesn't mean you should like them. So unless the guy has interacted with hostility towards gays, I don't see how he breaks Christian morals.

Anyway, my point was that people here are demonizing the guy just because his morals don't match theirs.
 
  • #46


They have basic disagreements in their beliefs and he refuses to discuss it. That might be fine if they were just aquaintences that met occasionally, but as a husband and wife, it's a recipe for failure.
 
  • #47


Seems like a lot of posts are trying to decide who's right and who's wrong. My personal experience is that it doesn't matter. If you hold radically different views on matters of great importance to one or the other of you it won't work. Ask my ex wives. Move on before you become legally obligated.
 
  • #48


Evo said:
They have basic disagreements in their beliefs and he refuses to discuss it. That might be fine if they were just aquaintences that met occasionally, but as a husband and wife, it's a recipe for failure.

alan2 said:
Seems like a lot of posts are trying to decide who's right and who's wrong. My personal experience is that it doesn't matter. If you hold radically different views on matters of great importance to one or the other of you it won't work. Ask my ex wives. Move on before you become legally obligated.

+1 for wisdom.
 
  • #49


A one more factor - in early 20s people don't have fully developed their views. It would evolve. That are last years in which one could support beautiful visions and his/her world is black and white. Idealism, in this case in its conservative version could melt away, and be replaced by cynicism and pragmatism. (I'm not making it up, that what has happened to me, really. Now I'm 26). Neither of you should be in long run invulnerable to this process, so the problem should partially diminish with time. Really, on average in long term people with more experience and knowledge tend to have more moderate views, regardless of starting point.

Assuming that you can reach a reasonable compromise how to bring up children with person of different views and can have all discussion civic... Honestly, if his opposite political views are the only problem... Keep him.

EDIT: And I've got an annoying feeling that for a few people here having such views as her boyfriend has is an evidence that he is twisted, manipulative and evil. Come on... (In Europe we have hordes of left wing who fight crusades against GMO and nuclear energy, so I think that accepting science as long as it does not oppose already held convictions is not a problem that affects only right wing)
 
Last edited:
  • #50


I love how people took Jimmy's joke seriously. =')
 
  • #51


Your homophobic boyfriend is just very boy right now. Years later, he'll become friendly to everyone, and when he reaches 40 or so, he'll be one.
 
  • #52


tahayassen said:
I love how people took Jimmy's joke seriously. =')

That happens to poor Jimmy regularly :biggrin:.
 
  • #53


Sorry to get in so late in the discussion. I have read the entire thread and something came to mind early and stayed until the end. One word: Narcissist

I am not qualified to say more but I strongly suggest that you seek out a therapist trained in psychology and ask them whether your bf is narcissistic personality. I fear that he is.

Best of Luck and NO, 25 is not the end of the road. Gad the narrow perception of the very young. I met my wife when she was 35 and we've been together 21 years. How? We talk frankly and openly about our values, beliefs or lack of them and world view. We held nothing back. Now, we are the happiest people I know.

No, 25 is not too late. There is such a wonderful cornecopia of people and personalities out there. Go get some.

Rob
 
  • #54


Rob D said:
Sorry to get in so late in the discussion. I have read the entire thread and something came to mind early and stayed until the end. One word: Narcissist

I am not qualified to say more but I strongly suggest that you seek out a therapist trained in psychology and ask them whether your bf is narcissistic personality. I fear that he is.

Best of Luck and NO, 25 is not the end of the road. Gad the narrow perception of the very young. I met my wife when she was 35 and we've been together 21 years. How? We talk frankly and openly about our values, beliefs or lack of them and world view. We held nothing back. Now, we are the happiest people I know.

No, 25 is not too late. There is such a wonderful cornecopia of people and personalities out there. Go get some.

Rob
My bf doesn't have a narcissistic personality. Also, you're a guy so it's a lot easier for you to meet someone at 35 than it is for a woman. I bet your wife is younger than you. Women are much more heavily judged on beauty and youth. I don't think that 25 is the end but the fact is that the majority of guys are married by age 30 (~70%). I know a lot of these marriage fail but I don't want to marry a guy with kids and/or baggage. When you factor in the fact that people usually date for a few years before marriage it leaves a much smaller pool of suitors. I'm just trying to be realistic. I used to be idealistic and I thought I would hold out for a guy that was close to perfect for me but I realize now that's probably never going to happen. In fact, out of all the guys I've gotten to know, I think my bf would make the best partner and the pool is as large as it's going to get.
 
  • #55


He's not the only one for you.

There are thousands of other people..perhaps millions, that you could potentially get along with.

Your scope of the amount of people out there is very limited...more than you think.
 
  • #56


Rob D said:
Sorry to get in so late in the discussion. I have read the entire thread and something came to mind early and stayed until the end. One word: Narcissist
I am not qualified to say more but I strongly suggest that you seek out a therapist trained in psychology and ask them whether your bf is narcissistic personality. I fear that he is.

Interesting I came to a similar conclusion, only about the OP. Who seems to be over complicating and obsessing about this, and is acutally the one with the problem.

Spot the inconsistency.
Help, my boyfriend is very homophobic but a great boyfriend.
He believes they deserve to be treated well just like any other human being and that "one should love the person but not what they do".

Disagreeing with someones lifestyle, is not homophobia. Especially when you yourself say he doesn't believe in discrimination.

This is a thing I've been noticing more and more lately, or something that 'atheists' do. They tend to be egotists, suffer from arrogance/intelectual snobbery and mock others for differing viewpoints whilst accusing others of intolerance.

The tendency to label and box oneself, then look down upon anyone who doesn't have the same label tattood on their forehead.I am an atheist, I believe x,y,z. My subjective position is right becuase I R RATIONAL!

I just feel like I could make him see the light if I could appeal to his reason a bit. Actually I think the biggest problem is that he's a bit closed minded.
Do you not see how condecending this is? "See the light?" Gordon Bennet. You also proceed to mock and use an insult for not enjoying the same things as you.

I just feel like if you don't like ANY literature then you must be missing something. I think that perhaps he lacks emotional intelligence.
Does this matter? Does it matter if he doesn't agree with you regarding the lifestyle of a gay person. Does it matter that he doesn't like literature? You also mock him for his poor grammar.



Now on saying all of that.
Can we make it work?
Judging by how much you defended him, and seem to genuinely care. Yes. All of the diffeences appear to be irrelevent. If anything is going to torpedo the relationship, it's your obsessing with how it could fail.
 
Last edited:
  • #57


To xxChrisxx: While I am Atheist and Anti-theist in the Hitchens sort of way, I hope that I conduct all aspects of my life with proper humility and empathy. Hence my concern that the young lady is confronted with a narcissist. However, your perhaps quite insightful observatiion that she is the personality problem at play in this situation may be spot on. I could argue that my suggestion to seek professional counsel is, then, ever the better one.

Toph fan: If I may be so bold, exactly why did you come to this group, a forum composed of perhaps the most pragmatic bunch on the internet, to discuss an interpersonal problem? We're more "Dear Dr. Susskind" than "Dear Dr. Phil".

Yes, I'm older than my wife. However, we recognized that to be a problem in our pre-nuptial discussions rather than an advantage.

Hitch Abides,
Rob
 
  • #58


xxChrisxx said:
Interesting I came to a similar conclusion, only about the OP. Who seems to be over complicating and obsessing about this, and is acutally the one with the problem.

Spot the inconsistency.
Disagreeing with someones lifestyle, is not homophobia. Especially when you yourself say he doesn't believe in discrimination.

This is a thing I've been noticing more and more lately, or something that 'atheists' do. They tend to be egotists, suffer from arrogance/intelectual snobbery and mock others for differing viewpoints whilst accusing others of intolerance.

The tendency to label and box oneself, then look down upon anyone who doesn't have the same label tattood on their forehead.I am an atheist, I believe x,y,z. My subjective position is right becuase I R RATIONAL!Do you not see how condecending this is? "See the light?" Gordon Bennet. You also proceed to mock and use an insult for not enjoying the same things as you.Does this matter? Does it matter if he doesn't agree with you regarding the lifestyle of a gay person. Does it matter that he doesn't like literature? You also mock him for his poor grammar.
Now on saying all of that.

Judging by how much you defended him, and seem to genuinely care. Yes. All of the diffeences appear to be irrelevent. If anything is going to torpedo the relationship, it's your obsessing with how it could fail.
So we broke up yesterday.

The problem is that he thinks being gay is a choice. The problem is that he believes this because he's intellectually lazy. I'm not saying he's intellectually lazy because his beliefs are different than mine but because I know how he justifies his beliefs. Whenever I question him on why he believes something, he justifies it very poorly. For example, he believes that being gay is a choice because the bible condemns homosexuality. However, that doesn't make sense because premarital sex is also condemned yet it's obvious that people have the desire to have premarital sex. He was originally against premarital sex but then decided it was ok and that makes him a hypocrite. In fact he was the one who convinced me to have sex. Also, he doesn't believe that DADT should have been repealed or that gays should be allowed to marry or have children. Intellectual laziness becomes a problem when it infringes on other people's rights.

Also, I didn't really tell the full story behind the grammar thing. My bf constantly complains about how other people are dumb and can't spell/write. In fact, he even went so far to correct me and another person on our fb status. It's kind of annoying that he takes so much pride in something that he's not that good at.
 
  • #59


Toph_fan said:
The problem is that he thinks being gay is a choice. The problem is that he believes this because he's intellectually lazy. I'm not saying he's intellectually lazy because his beliefs are different than mine but because I know how he justifies his beliefs. Whenever I question him on why he believes something, he justifies it very poorly.

Define justifies poorly? What you really mean is didn't come to an conclusion that you deemed valid or 'rationally'. Opinions are frequently derived emotionally, and there really isn't anything wrong with that if it doesn't affect anyone else. As you said before he doesn't believe in discrimination.

What if he agreed with your position but didn't have a rational reason for it?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Storm_in_a_Teacup
 
  • #60


xxChrisxx said:
Define justifies poorly? What you really mean is didn't come to an conclusion that you deemed valid or 'rationally'. Opinions are frequently derived emotionally, and there really isn't anything wrong with that if it doesn't affect anyone else. As you said before he doesn't believe in discrimination.
She gave an example of what she's talking about. How is that not good enough? I think it's clear what she means, and that there's definitely something wrong with the way of thinking that she's describing.
 
  • #61


xxChrisxx said:
Define justifies poorly? What you really mean is didn't come to an conclusion that you deemed valid or 'rationally'. Opinions are frequently derived emotionally, and there really isn't anything wrong with that if it doesn't affect anyone else. As you said before he doesn't believe in discrimination.

What if he agreed with your position but didn't have a rational reason for it?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Storm_in_a_Teacup

If he doesn't approve of the gay lifestyle that's his opinion and I can't really argue against it, however, if he believes that being gay is a choice for ALL gay people then I can definitely argue against that with reason. That's denying science. He thinks that gay people should go to therapy and pray the gay away. One of the reasons we broke up was because he and his brother became more enthusiastic about their religion recently and started pressuring me to go to church. That's where I drew the line. He was the one trying to force his opinions on me in the end.
 
  • #62


I agree, and at the risk of overreaching I also agree with her decision to end the relationship. If for no other reason other than, using her description, he sounds quite annoying. And, for reasons I cannot explain, I imagine that Ms. toph fan is quite physically attractive and by expanding her scope just a bit will have no problem filling the vacant position.

But what do I know about such things? I'm a happily married middle-aged theorist who hasn't dated in 25 years. However, we must remember that Feynman, at my age, did some of his best work on the cocktail napkins of titty-bars.
 
Last edited:
  • #63
Do you remember that episode of Static Shock when Richie had a racist father? You should find a way to make him change his views about homosexuality.
 
  • #64
I've seen this bs too many times among my own hillbilly family and friends. I recognize the pattern right away.

So you broke up. Good riddance.
I know folks who are going into medical fields, so they know quite a bit of math & biology, yet believe in Adam and Eve and think evolution is bs. It doesn't matter how 'smart' they are if they're willfully ignorant.

It's not your job to change anyone. You can't make him 'see the light'.

Don't ever settle with someone just because you think you're 'expired'. It's better to be single than have someone be the cancer in your bones. Staying by him would've been like buying a rotten apple at the grocery store just because you can't find any other apples at the moment. There may be more apples at the other side of the store, or more apples will arrive the next day... Would you eat a rotten apple only because it's the only thing you found at the moment?

You have to judge a relationship by it's worst moments. Those show how far the other person is willing to hurt you.
 
  • #65
Okay, I don't normally weigh in on others feelings, so here is my two cents for what it's worth.
#1. Tick tock, as in biological clock is running and you are watching the clock. Bad, move very bad.
#2. Can you say control freak? This is what you are dealing with and it's only the beginning. It will get worse for you if you stay with him. He will "promise you the moon" but watch what comes instead.
#3. RUN AWAY from him as fast as you can. The farther the better. Distance will be to your advantage if he can't get to you.

The good news is you broke up with him.
PLEASE PLEASE keep it that way for your own good.

Good Luck
 
  • #66
You mentioned you hope to change him. You shouldn't be in a relationship with someone who you feel you have to change.

If you can't cast all doubt away and you don't feel the relation is well balanced, it might not be a bad idea to consider other options in terms of your current relationship. There is no way around it, but you need to talk to him and get him to talk to you about your concerns and try to find a middle ground.

Trying to change someone is silly. The best you can do is explain why you believe the things you do (homosexuality and religion) in hopes that he understands, or at the very least respect your views, and if not, it's time to move on.

Just my $0.02

Good luck in whatever you decide to do op!

Edit: my bad, didn't realize how old this thread was
 
Last edited:
  • #67
The member that started this thread hasn't even been here for 2 years, so I am closing this thread.
 
  • Like
Likes 1 person

Similar threads

Replies
16
Views
2K
  • General Discussion
Replies
10
Views
935
Replies
10
Views
672
Replies
1
Views
642
  • General Discussion
Replies
16
Views
2K
  • General Discussion
Replies
24
Views
1K
  • General Discussion
Replies
7
Views
1K
  • General Discussion
Replies
1
Views
540
  • General Discussion
Replies
1
Views
1K
Replies
3
Views
746
Back
Top