Brain function & bipolar: fluid volume & speed of information in tubes

In summary, the author is trying to explain how brain function changes during different episodes of bipolar disorder. He states that during "highs", people experience extreme flourishes of creativity and critical thinking. He asks a physicist for help understanding a law or rule that could explain this phenomenon. The physicist is unclear about the author's request and asks a number of questions about the author's care and medication schedule.
  • #1
notaphysicsmajor79
1
0
This is a long post with limited amount of physics in it (but it is a physics question, so hopefully it is allowed). I am a scientist but trained as an ecologist (PhD) and despite my long interest in physics, my knowledge of it remains rather rudimentary. Apologies for that, in advance.

I am trying to figure out an actual physics law/rule as a way to explain anecdotal brain function during different episodes of bipolar to someone who would better understand physics than psychology. But all the information I can dig out is too complicated and only considers detailed factors when I am only looking for "yes: x relates to y and z like this" -so I would really appreciate your help!

There are three "levels" in bipolar disorder (when over-simplified): "normal", "low" or "high". During these episodes, various things change, not just mood. People often experience intense flourishes of creativity and critical thinking during "highs" (this is well documented in many famous artists and composers etc) -and I am no exception.

The way I have always explained it to people goes along these lines:

LOW: it feels like my brain is foggy, there is very little activity, everything I try and think about takes forever and recalling information and storing it is difficult (a bit like an old, crap computer). It feels like my brain pipes are wide, convoluted, some end in dead-ends and only a small amount of information actually comes out at the other end, at slow velocity. So multiple branches of tubes, some with dead ends, wide tunnels, little flow through.

"NORMAL": all the tunnels are now as one, regular sized tunnel. Flow is good and strong, even and predictable. Memory works, memory recall is normal (for my age and number of children that is!)

"HIGH": All of the liquid (information flow, brain processing, memory recall and storage) present during "NORMAL" now goes through a pipe that is the circumference of a pencil. Lightspeed. I can do things 100x faster AND 100x more when I am high than when I low -I can do 5 things that I have been thinking about doing for 6months when I am low in 3 minutes when I am high.
(you are probably thinking, wow, I'd love to stay high all the time -unfortunately it disintegrates into complete chaos (turbulence at high flow rates?) after some time and it is not healthy).

Sooooo. The same amount of fluid going through, so constant flow, all other things being equal (temperature, type of fluid etc?), size of the tube changing, the speed changing. What is the relationship between the factors? Are they linear? If I were to say "I'm feeling normal, I'm feeling twice as good (the size (smaller) of my "brain pipes") as I feel when I'm low, therefore my brain function (speed) is...twice as/quadrupled etc good?

Probably the weirdest question you have ever had!? :D
Hope this is ok and makes sense?
Thanks for taking the time to read my rambles. x
 
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  • #2
Your thread is currently in Moderation for discussion by the Mentors.

In the mean time, are you under a doctor's care for this condition? Are you staying on schedule with your prescribed medications?
 

Related to Brain function & bipolar: fluid volume & speed of information in tubes

1. What is the relationship between brain function and bipolar disorder?

Bipolar disorder is a mental health condition that affects brain function. People with bipolar disorder experience extreme shifts in mood, energy, and activity levels, which can affect their thoughts, behaviors, and emotions.

2. How does fluid volume impact brain function in individuals with bipolar disorder?

Studies have shown that individuals with bipolar disorder have a decrease in gray matter volume in certain brain regions, such as the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. This decrease in volume can affect brain function and contribute to symptoms of bipolar disorder.

3. Is there a difference in the speed of information processing in the brain of individuals with bipolar disorder?

Research has shown that individuals with bipolar disorder have slower processing speeds compared to those without the disorder. This can impact their ability to think, problem-solve, and make decisions.

4. How do tubes play a role in brain function and bipolar disorder?

The "tubes" referred to in this question likely represent the neural pathways in the brain. In individuals with bipolar disorder, these neural pathways may be disrupted or altered, leading to difficulties in regulating emotions and behaviors.

5. Can brain function and bipolar disorder be improved or treated?

Yes, there are various treatments available for bipolar disorder, including medication, therapy, and lifestyle changes. These treatments can help improve brain function and manage symptoms of bipolar disorder. It is important to work with a mental health professional to determine the best treatment plan for each individual.

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