Calculate the angular acceleration of a hand - no time given

In summary, the problem involves calculating the angular acceleration of a hand rotating about the wrist in the sagittal plane. Given the linear acceleration of the centre of mass (3 m/s/s), the distance from the wrist joint to the centre of mass (0.04 m), and the fact that the mass is against gravity, the correct calculation is to use the cosine of 60 degrees to find the tangential component of the linear acceleration. From there, the angular acceleration can be calculated using the equation a = αr, which gives a value of 37.5 rad/s/s.
  • #1
BosonF

Homework Statement


When the hand is rotating about the wrist in the sagittal plane its centre of mass has an acceleration of 3m/s(squared) in a horizontal direction, its mass is 2kg and the vertical direction (i.e. Y) is against gravity. The hand travels through 30 degrees. If the distance from the wrist joint to the centre of mass is 0.04m, what should the angular acceleration of the hand about the wrist be?
a) 17.5
b) 27.5
c) 37.5
d) 47.5

Homework Equations


angular acceleration = change in angular velocity/time

The Attempt at a Solution


To calculate the time I made an assumption that the starting velocity was 0 and the ending velocity was 3m//s. I converted the degrees to radians by multiplying by pi/180. To calculate the distance traveled in the x direction I used x= Cos30 x 0.04. So if the hand travels 3m in 1s then it travels xm in x/3 s. Which worked out as 0.034641/3 = 0.01155s.

To find the angular acceleration I then divided the radians by the time. which gave me 0.5236-0/0.01155 = 45.33 rad/s(squared)

Have I followed the correct method?
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
As far as I can see there is no need to calculate a "time" or a "distance".

You are given the linear acceleration of the centre of mass (3m/s/s), the radius (0.04m) and asked to calculate the angular acceleration.

Do you know the equation that relates these three things?
 
  • Like
Likes BosonF
  • #3
Oh, is it tangential acceleration = angular acceleration x radius?

What a relief, thank you!
 
  • #4
That's the equation I was thinking of but it doesn't appear to give one of the multi choice answers.

So perhaps the geometry isn't as simple as I thought. I've no idea what the sagittal plane is.
 
  • Like
Likes BosonF
  • #5
Yes I realized it was slightly out after I calculated the answer. But then I wondered whether the radius should be the length of the hand rather than the distance to the centre of mass.

There is a table of the relative per cent of the length of the hand where the centre of mass is in the notes. I contains two values from two different people. If I take the average value I get 45.15 per cent. Using that with 0.04 gives the length of the full hand as 0.08859358 m.

Using the length of the hand as a radius I get 33.86 rad/s/s. So close to one of the answers.

Does that look right? Or have I gone off track again?
 
  • #6
Think that's wrong. It says that he centre of mass has linear acceleration 3m/s/s so it's the radius of the centre of mass that matters when calculating the angular acceleration. That gives an answer of 75rads/s. Perhaps the book answer is wrong?

Can you check the wording of the problem because I am wondering if they they might be asking for the acceleration in a different plane to that of the rotation? Is it a coincidence that sin(30) = 0.5 and that half of 75 is 37.5? Was a diagram provided?
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Likes BosonF
  • #7
There is also a diagram included with the question. I have attached it here.

Here is the exact wording of the question:

When the hand is rotating about the wrist in the sagittal plane as shown in the figure below, its centre of mass has an acceleration of 3 m/s/s in the horizontal direction, its mass is 2kg and the vertical direction (i.e. Y) us against the direction of gravity.

If the distance from the wrist joint to the COM is 4cm, what should the angular acceleration of the hand about the wrist be?
a) 17.5 rad/s/s
b) 27.5 rad/s/s
c) 37.5 rad/s/s
d) 47.5 rad/s/s

Thank you so much for your help.
 

Attachments

  • diagram.jpg
    diagram.jpg
    11.8 KB · Views: 512
  • #8
OK all is clear. I have to go out for a few hours but will try to post a marked up drawing when I get back. Meanwhile the radius to be used in the equation is indeed 0.04*Sin(30) making the answer 37.5 m/s/s. Well at least I think so!
 
  • Like
Likes BosonF
  • #9
Thank you :smile:
 
  • #10
Here is a drawing..
Arm Diagram.jpg

There is a slight change to what I said in post #8. It's Cos(60) rather than Sin(30) but this is also 0.5..

The green line shows the Linear Acceleration which the problem statement says is horizontal (3m/s).
The purple line shows the tangential component of the Linear Acceleration = 3Cos(60)

So I make the angular acceleration...

3Cos(60)/0.04 = 37.5 rads/sec

Hope I have that right as I'm a bit tired after driving my kids to rugby training.
 
  • Like
Likes BosonF
  • #11
Thank you so much, I really appreciate your help. The drawing has really helped my understanding.
 

Related to Calculate the angular acceleration of a hand - no time given

1. How do you calculate the angular acceleration of a hand?

The formula for calculating angular acceleration is angular velocity divided by time. In this case, the angular velocity of the hand and the time it takes to complete one rotation would need to be known in order to calculate the angular acceleration.

2. Can the angular acceleration of a hand be measured in any unit?

Angular acceleration is typically measured in radians per second squared (rad/s^2) or degrees per second squared (deg/s^2). However, other units such as revolutions per second squared (rev/s^2) can also be used.

3. Does the length of the hand affect its angular acceleration?

Yes, the length of the hand can affect its angular acceleration. A longer hand will have a larger distance to travel in the same amount of time, resulting in a greater angular acceleration compared to a shorter hand.

4. What factors can cause variations in the angular acceleration of a hand?

The angular acceleration of a hand can be affected by several factors including the force applied to the hand, the mass of the hand, and any external resistance or friction.

5. Is it possible to increase the angular acceleration of a hand?

Yes, the angular acceleration of a hand can be increased by increasing the angular velocity or decreasing the time it takes to complete one rotation. This can be done by applying a greater force or reducing any external resistance or friction on the hand.

Similar threads

  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
7
Views
381
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
17
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
9
Views
479
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
5
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
5K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
7
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
3K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
5
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
3K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
5
Views
1K
Back
Top