Calculating Force Exerted by a Pivot on a Meter Rule

In summary, the weight of a uniform meter rule is 1.5N and the force exerted by the pivot on the meter rule is 0.5N downwards. This is determined by adding up the forces acting on the meter rule, including the force of the pivot and the force from the spring balance. The direction of the force must also be taken into consideration.
  • #1
Taylor_1989
402
14

Homework Statement


The weight of a uniform meter rule is 1.5N. Calculate the force exerted by the pivot on the meter rule.


The answer in the back of the book say it is magnitude of 0.5N downwards, I have tried every combo of equation from m=f*d to W=m*g

There are 3 question before, which I don't think are relevant to this question. Which I answers and got right. I have drawn a diagram to show what the meter rule looks like.
 

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  • #2
Just add up the forces. (No need for moments to answer this question.)
 
  • #3
Doc Al said:
Just add up the forces. (No need for moments to answer this question.)

I don't understand, by add up the force. If I add 6N plus 1.5N, it dose not equal 0.5N. Could you please expand on your answer?
 
  • #4
Taylor_1989 said:
I don't understand, by add up the force. If I add 6N plus 1.5N, it dose not equal 0.5N. Could you please expand on your answer?
Don't forget the force from the spring balance, presumably acting upward.

So, including the force of the pivot itself, I count four forces acting.
 
  • #5
Doc Al said:
Don't forget the force from the spring balance, presumably acting upward.

So, including the force of the pivot itself, I count four forces acting.

I see where you are coming from, I was not taking direction of the force being applied.

Thanks for clearing that up, it has been bugging me all day.
 

Related to Calculating Force Exerted by a Pivot on a Meter Rule

What is a pivot on a meter rule and how does it affect force calculation?

A pivot is a point on a meter rule where the ruler can rotate or pivot. This pivot point is important in force calculation because it is the location where the force is applied.

What is the formula for calculating force exerted by a pivot on a meter rule?

The formula for calculating force exerted by a pivot on a meter rule is F = l x W, where F is the force exerted, l is the length of the meter rule from the pivot point to the point where the force is applied, and W is the weight of the object being lifted.

How do I determine the direction of the force exerted by a pivot on a meter rule?

The direction of the force exerted by a pivot on a meter rule is determined by the direction in which the force is applied. If the force is applied vertically downwards, the force exerted by the pivot will also be vertically downwards. If the force is applied at an angle, the direction of the force exerted by the pivot will be at the same angle.

What happens to the force exerted by a pivot on a meter rule if the length of the ruler is increased?

If the length of the ruler is increased, the force exerted by the pivot will also increase, assuming the weight of the object being lifted remains the same. This is because the longer the ruler, the greater the lever arm, resulting in a greater force being exerted.

Can multiple pivots on a meter rule affect force calculation?

Yes, if there are multiple pivots on a meter rule, the force calculation will need to take into account the length of the ruler from each pivot point to the point where the force is applied. The total force exerted by the pivots can be calculated by adding the individual forces exerted by each pivot.

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