Calculating Vertical Jump Heights

In summary, the conversation discusses the difficulty for humans to jump more than 2 feet and provides a formula for calculating the time spent moving upward and the hang time. In part b, the vertical height of Michael Jordan's jump is calculated using the hang time of 1 second. However, there was an error in the calculation as the hang time should have been divided by 2.
  • #1
needhelp83
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Surprisingly, very few humans can jump more than 2 feet (0.6 m) straight up. Solve for the time one spends moving upward in a 2-foot vertical jump. Then double it for the "hang time" - the time one's feet are off the ground.
b) Calculate the vertical height of Michael Jordan's jump when he attains a hang time of a full 1 s.

a)
t=sqrt(2d/g) =sqrt(2(0.6 m))/9.8 =0.35 s

Hangtime=0.35 s x 2= 0.70 s

b)
d=(1/2)gt2=(1/2)(9.8 m/s2)(1.0 s)2= 4.9 m


Is this correct?
 
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  • #2
needhelp83 said:
Surprisingly, very few humans can jump more than 2 feet (0.6 m) straight up. Solve for the time one spends moving upward in a 2-foot vertical jump. Then double it for the "hang time" - the time one's feet are off the ground.
b) Calculate the vertical height of Michael Jordan's jump when he attains a hang time of a full 1 s.

a)
t=sqrt(2d/g) =sqrt(2(0.6 m))/9.8 =0.35 s

Hangtime=0.35 s x 2= 0.70 s

b)
d=(1/2)gt2=(1/2)(9.8 m/s2)(1.0 s)2= 4.9 m


Is this correct?
you forgot to divide the hang time by 2 in part b. part a is a ok.
 
Last edited:
  • #3


Yes, this is correct. The calculation for the time spent moving upward in a 2-foot vertical jump is 0.35 seconds, and the hang time is double that at 0.70 seconds. The vertical height of Michael Jordan's jump with a hang time of 1 second is approximately 4.9 meters.
 

Related to Calculating Vertical Jump Heights

1. How do you measure vertical jump height?

To measure vertical jump height, you will need a measuring tape or yardstick, a flat surface, and a wall or pole to mark the highest point of the jump. Stand next to the wall or pole and reach up as high as you can, marking the spot with a piece of tape or chalk. Then, stand next to the wall or pole again and jump as high as you can, marking the highest point you reach on the wall or pole. Measure the distance between the two marks, and that is your vertical jump height.

2. What is the formula for calculating vertical jump height?

The formula for calculating vertical jump height is as follows: Jump Height = 0.5 x (Gravity x Time)^2. This formula takes into account the force of gravity and the time it takes for you to reach the highest point of your jump. It is important to note that this formula is an estimate and may not be 100% accurate for everyone.

3. Can you calculate vertical jump height without using equipment?

Yes, you can estimate your vertical jump height without using any equipment. One way to do this is by performing a standing vertical jump and measuring the distance between the ground and the tips of your fingers at the highest point of your jump. However, this method may not be as accurate as using measuring tools.

4. How can I improve my vertical jump height?

To improve your vertical jump height, you can incorporate strength training exercises, such as squats and lunges, into your workout routine. Plyometric exercises, such as jump squats and box jumps, can also help increase your explosive power. Additionally, focusing on proper form and technique during jumps can also make a significant difference in your jump height.

5. Does body weight affect vertical jump height?

Yes, body weight can affect vertical jump height. Generally, the lighter the body weight, the higher the vertical jump height. This is because the force of gravity has less resistance on a lighter body, allowing for a higher jump. However, muscle mass and strength also play a significant role in vertical jump height, so it is important to find a balance between body weight and muscle development for optimal jumping ability.

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