Calculus and Physics texts for refrence

In summary, the conversation centers around the topic of finding good reference books for calculus and physics. The individual has already completed rigorous coursework in both subjects and is looking for recommendations on which books to purchase for future reference. Recommendations are given for older editions of popular textbooks such as Stewart's calculus books and Halliday's physics books, as well as alternative options like Apostol for calculus and the Feynman Lectures. The differences between older and newer editions of Resnick and Halliday's books are also discussed, with some preferring the older editions for their more challenging problems. Ultimately, the conversation suggests that the individual should do some research and find a textbook that best suits their needs and preferences.
  • #1
Doom of Doom
86
0
Ok, so I am just ending my first freshman semester at college. I took two years of calculus and physics in high school and got 5's on the AP tests for Physics C and Calculus BC. So, when I got to college, I was placed into Calc III and Into to Modern Physics. They've been great classes, and even without the rigorous calculus training from college, I've done outstandingly well in both classes. The only thing that I regret is not having are my own introductory books for calculus and physics so that I could look through them for reference, because I had to use the school's books when I was in high school.

I was wondering what books I should get to keep and use as reference for the future. I used Stewart's calculus books and Halliday's physics books in high school, and thought they were ok, but not great.

I've already had extensive training in physics and calculus, so what kind of books should I get just for reference? I was thinking like Apostol for calculus, but they run kind of expensive. What do y'all think?
 
Last edited:
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
Well, since you don't need them for a class, you don't need to get the latest editions. For R&H, I find https://www.amazon.com/dp/0471024562/?tag=pfamazon01-20 to be much better than Fundamentals of Physics.

More used options http://www.bookfinder4u.com/OutOfPr...sher=&isbn=&binding=&dj=&fe=&sg=&currency=USD. My preferences are for the 1977 3rd edition of Physics, but that's just because it's the edition I have.

And I think the Feynman Lectures make a fine reference. The lecture format makes it easy to brush up on particular topics.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #3
Ok great.

I was wondering, what is the difference between the older editions of Resnick and Halliday and the newer ones? Nobody seems to like the newer versions on this forum, but that seems to be what a lot of colleges are using these days.
 
  • #4
I'm under the impression that the older ones acknowledged that the reader had a brain, the newer one oversimplifies everything and the problems are almost always plug and chug from a formula that they provided as a quick reference.
 
  • #5
Doom of Doom said:
Ok great.

I was wondering, what is the difference between the older editions of Resnick and Halliday and the newer ones? Nobody seems to like the newer versions on this forum, but that seems to be what a lot of colleges are using these days.

There's a difference between Physics and Fundamentals of Physics, the latter being somewhat watered down. Also the problems in Physics are more challenging. I'm comparing the 3rd edition of Physics with the 2nd "extended" edition of Fundamentals. However, for reference purposes, Fundamentals may be fine, and used copies are really easy to find.

Some people also like the 1966 edition of Physics. Try searching the forum, there have been a couple of threads on Resnick and Halliday.

And of course there are other respected textbooks like Sears, another one that goes back many decades.
 

Related to Calculus and Physics texts for refrence

1. What is the difference between calculus and physics?

Calculus is a branch of mathematics that deals with the study of change and is used to solve problems involving rates of change, while physics is a natural science that studies matter, energy, and their interactions.

2. How is calculus used in physics?

Calculus is used in physics to describe and analyze physical phenomena, such as motion, forces, and energy. It provides a mathematical framework for understanding and predicting the behavior of physical systems.

3. What are some common applications of calculus in physics?

Some common applications of calculus in physics include determining the velocity and acceleration of an object, calculating the work done by a force, and finding the maximum or minimum value of a physical quantity.

4. Do I need to know calculus to understand physics?

While a basic understanding of calculus is helpful in understanding physics, it is not necessary for all concepts. Many introductory physics courses do not require prior knowledge of calculus, but higher level courses may rely heavily on it.

5. Are there any recommended calculus and physics texts for reference?

Yes, there are many textbooks that cover both calculus and physics. Some popular options include "Calculus: Early Transcendentals" by James Stewart and "University Physics" by Hugh D. Young and Roger A. Freedman. It is best to consult with your professor or academic advisor for specific recommendations.

Similar threads

  • Science and Math Textbooks
Replies
7
Views
2K
  • Science and Math Textbooks
Replies
32
Views
3K
  • Science and Math Textbooks
Replies
26
Views
3K
  • Science and Math Textbooks
Replies
2
Views
2K
  • Science and Math Textbooks
Replies
14
Views
2K
  • Science and Math Textbooks
Replies
12
Views
2K
  • Science and Math Textbooks
Replies
1
Views
1K
  • Science and Math Textbooks
Replies
5
Views
1K
Replies
4
Views
918
  • Science and Math Textbooks
Replies
27
Views
17K
Back
Top