Can a Self-Feeding Steam Turbine Recycle Its Own Water?

In summary, the conversation focuses on designing a steam turbine that recycles its water to prevent refilling of a boiler tank. The proposed solution involves using a water valve or a check valve to feed hot water into the tubing, which would then be forced out and directed at the steam turbine. The issue of needing something to turn the valve on and off is also mentioned. The individual is also seeking resources for further information and mentions that a steam-powered feed pump may have a throttle for efficiency. Additionally, using a recip engine may be a better option for those interested in torque rather than RPM.
  • #1
MrDiedel
3
0
I'm trying to design or find a design for a steam turbine that recycles it's water, or at least a large percentage of it, to prevent refilling of a boiler tank.

My thoughts;

The turbine will be powered by steam heated through copper tubing which is fed from a large unheated, (or partially heated) water tank. The water, upon entering the coiling tubing, will be heated from an external fire of whatever fuel I desire. My problem is trying to decide how to separate the pressure build up in the coiled tubing from the supply tank to prevent the pressure from going back into the tank. Or if my tank was large enough, would it simply push it out the top of my tubing directed at my turbine instead of going back into my supply tank? I think this would result in power loss.

The turbine does not have to run full power constantly. It could run on bursts. Oh, just thought of a solution...maybe.

If there was a water valve that opened and closed to feed the coiled tubing, upon entering the extremely hot tubing, the water would vaporize immediately and be forced out of the end of my tube pointed to my steam turbine. But would that cause the tubing to burst from cooler water hitting it? This also presents a problem of needing something to turn my valve off and on.

Or
A check valve that is pushed open by the weight of the water and fills the hot tubing, and when the hot tubing builds pressure, the check valve will be forced closed thus forcing the steam out of the end of my tube aimed at my steam turbine.

A further note, I'm more interested in torque than rpm, if anyone has any links or information for me to further my project, it would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks for taking the time to read my post.

Mr. Diedel

P.S. Of course the recycling part would be easily enough done with a condenser over the main holding tank, as it would be open to atmospheric pressure at the top.
 
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  • #2
If I remember correctly, the Principles of Naval Engineering would be a great resource for you. You can find it here: http://www.hnsa.org/doc/pdf/engineering.pdf
 
  • #3
Feed pump discharge pressure equals steam drum operating pressure at shut-off head. Feed pump discharge pressure must be higher than steam drum operating pressure to raise steam drum level. The feed regulator valve is on the discharge of the centrifugal pump that operates well at shut-off head with packing cooled by leakoff. A steam powered feed pump may have a throttle for efficiency. The steam drum and tubes are at saturation pressure and temperature. A steam turbine powered pump cannot function with wet steam water droplets. Some condensate depression, temperature lower than saturation, is necessary.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/1/12/Feedwater-heating.png/354px-Feedwater-heating.png
 
  • #4
If you are interested in torque rather than RPM maybe a recip engine is the way to go.
 
  • #5


Dear Mr. Diedel,

Thank you for sharing your thoughts and ideas on designing a self-feeding steam turbine. It is commendable that you are considering ways to recycle water and prevent refilling of the boiler tank. I would like to offer some suggestions and insights on your proposed design.

Firstly, using copper tubing to transfer the heated water to the turbine is a good choice as copper is a good conductor of heat. However, it is important to consider the material properties of the tubing and ensure that it can withstand the high temperatures and pressures of the steam.

In terms of separating the pressure build up in the coiled tubing from the supply tank, you could consider using a pressure relief valve. This valve would open when the pressure in the tubing reaches a certain level, releasing the steam and preventing it from going back into the tank. This would also prevent any potential damage to the tubing.

Your idea of using a water valve to feed the coiled tubing and utilizing the immediate vaporization of water in the hot tubing is also a viable option. However, as you mentioned, this would require a mechanism to turn the valve on and off. You could consider using a float valve or a solenoid valve that is triggered by the level of water in the tank.

Alternatively, the use of a check valve to fill the hot tubing and release the steam when the pressure builds up is also a good idea. This would require less maintenance and control mechanisms compared to the water valve option.

In terms of maximizing torque over RPM, you could consider using a larger turbine with shorter blades to increase the torque output. Additionally, the design of the blades can also play a role in optimizing torque.

Lastly, for further information and resources on steam turbines, I would suggest consulting with experts in the field or referring to scientific literature and research papers. I hope this helps in your project and I wish you all the best.

Sincerely,
 

Related to Can a Self-Feeding Steam Turbine Recycle Its Own Water?

1. What is a self-feeding steam turbine?

A self-feeding steam turbine is a type of steam turbine that is designed to produce power by using the energy of expanding steam. It is self-feeding because it is able to continue operating without the need for an external power source, such as an electric motor.

2. How does a self-feeding steam turbine work?

A self-feeding steam turbine works by using the energy of expanding steam to rotate the turbine blades. The steam is produced by heating water using a boiler. As the steam expands, it pushes against the turbine blades, causing them to rotate. This rotation is then used to power a generator, which produces electricity.

3. What are the advantages of using a self-feeding steam turbine?

There are several advantages to using a self-feeding steam turbine. One of the main advantages is its self-sustaining nature, which means it does not require an external power source. This makes it a reliable and cost-effective option for producing electricity. Additionally, steam turbines are highly efficient and can be used to produce large amounts of power.

4. What are the main components of a self-feeding steam turbine?

The main components of a self-feeding steam turbine include a boiler, turbine blades, a rotor, a generator, and a condenser. The boiler is used to heat water and produce steam, which then passes through the turbine blades to rotate the rotor. The rotor is connected to the generator, which converts the rotational energy into electricity. The condenser is used to cool and condense the steam after it has passed through the turbine.

5. What are the applications of self-feeding steam turbines?

Self-feeding steam turbines are commonly used in power plants to generate electricity. They can also be used in a variety of industrial processes, such as in the production of paper, chemicals, and food. Additionally, steam turbines are used in marine propulsion systems and can be found in some vehicles, such as steam-powered locomotives.

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