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Can area of a triangle be 0.5(c x a) instead of 0.5(a x c)?

  1. Aug 4, 2013 #1
    Please see the image attached.

    Does that have anything to do with directions? The right-hand rule?
     

    Attached Files:

  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 5, 2013 #2
    [itex]ca = ac[/itex], so yes.
     
  4. Aug 5, 2013 #3
    Not in that figure, unless angle B is 90 degrees.
     
  5. Aug 5, 2013 #4
    using the magnitude of the cross-product of two vectors to find the ar

    If you mean

    Area of triangle = (1/2)||A x C|| = (1/2)||C x A||

    as in, using the magnitude of the cross-product of two vectors to find the area of the triangle between them, then yes.
     

    Attached Files:

    • area.png
      area.png
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  6. Aug 5, 2013 #5
    I didn't see the second part of your question. The direction of ||A x C|| or ||C x A|| doesn't matter because they have the same magnitude. That is why (1/2)||A x C|| = (1/2)||C x A|| is true.
     
  7. Aug 5, 2013 #6
    Thank you very much.
     
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