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Can cosmologist mathematicians compute all the way to absolute nothingness?

  1. Sep 23, 2011 #1
    Please be patient with me.


    Cosmologists compute all the way back to the big bang when there was just a very condensed point of energy from which time, space, whatever else came forth, and now we have -- to be humorous -- a nose in our face that does not fall off even if we sneeze very hard.

    Can any genius of a cosmologist mathematician compute still further on backward until he can now tell mankind that voila he has reached the point of absolute nothingness, and thus he has proven that the universe came from nothing, on the basis of his scientific cosmological mathematics, working on whatever empirical data like CMB in today's state of the universe.

    Please forgive me if I sound whatever like flippant, I am really very serious, because I notice that cosmologists-mathematicians can really work wonders of cosmic scales with scientific cosmological mathematics.



    Yrreg
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 23, 2011 #2

    Math Is Hard

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    It's a question for cosmologists so I have moved it to the cosmology forum. -MIH
     
  4. Sep 24, 2011 #3

    Chalnoth

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    Calculating what happened at the earliest times is more of an empirical problem than a mathematical one. Basically, it's a question of which mathematics are correct at very early times, instead of just calculating from known mathematics.
     
  5. Sep 24, 2011 #4

    Chronos

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    The short answer is no. Our best theories fail at t<1 [planck time].
     
  6. Sep 24, 2011 #5

    You mean that there is no kind of mathematics however a genius mathematician one is whereby the genius can compute from empirical data today all the way beyond the big bang to absolute nothingness?

    So, is it then the implication and thereby also the certainty that there is always something existing that is the universe even though it is very very very very dense insofar as our computation goes, which computation must be based on genuine true mathematics not any kind of mathematricks?


    Now, tell me, how can these guys like Stenger and Krauss and Hawking state that the universe came from nothing unless they have another meaning for nothing which is something but not nothing?

    In which case they have another meaning for lying, when everyone else understands lying as saying with one's lips what one knows in one's mind to be not the fact.


    Thus also they are really more grievous liars.


    But why do they want to lie so grievously?




    Yrreg
     
  7. Sep 24, 2011 #6

    Chalnoth

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    If we use General Relativity as our theory of gravity, there is a singularity at t=0. This singularity is mathematical nonsense that cannot exist. It isn't matter of being better with the calculations: we need a quantum theory of gravity.
     
  8. Sep 24, 2011 #7

    Chronos

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    You are missing the point. There is no guarantee mathematics conceals the ultimate solution - and it is absolutely certain all solutions are mathematically validi. Why do you think physicists would lie? Are you asserting they are so vain they need to twist the truth to fit their version of reality? I believe the vast majority of physicists are totally honest.
     
  9. Sep 24, 2011 #8
    respected sir i thought that tomorrow is change in today. what ever change in universe occuers today is depend on any law or law comes out after change occuers. i also want to know that at t=0 second we were not there but still we were there in another forms thene can we prdict from today that what will happen tomorrow. if we know all the things universe had and how all the things in the universe behave (means charactristics of all the things etc. gravity and al such things that exist in the universe) than we aree able to trace out future or not?
     
  10. Sep 24, 2011 #9
    But they do give opposite meaning to the word nothing to mean something but making people psychologically convinced that they mean absolute nothingness.

    If they appear to you, I refer to people like Stenger, Krauss, and Hawking, not to be lying to others, then they are lying to themselves or being dishonest with themselves.

    Now, why would they want to lie to or to be dishonest to themselves?



    Yrreg
     
  11. Sep 24, 2011 #10

    Chalnoth

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    What are you going on about?
     
  12. Sep 24, 2011 #11
    Short answer is "NO".

    Longer answer:
    I quote you "if we know all the things universe had and how all the things in the universe behave". What are all the things - all the star, all the planets, all the molecules, all the electrons, protons, quarks, all the people, all the interstellar dust and gases? You may need to first think about what you mean by all the things. And then think about how you would go about calculating how all these things behave and react to one another. Are you up to task to do the calculation by tomorrow? Do you think you could design a computer for you to do the calculation faster than what is happening in the universe itself?

    You are setting up for a reply I bet. But let me counter that. There are formulas that are used how molecules react to one another for example. . Another set of calculations may yield an answer to the gravitational force between stars. Thermodynamic equations can solve problems for heat engines and energy flow in gases. So scientists use one set of equations for a particular problem at hand. And no there is not a theory of everthing yet, and even if and when it is discovered, it still would not be the one to use to calculate say how many miles per gallen you get in your car from driving down the street.
     
  13. Sep 24, 2011 #12
    I think he means that if the moment (start) of the big bang can not be calculated to the exact second at t=0 ( but only to 0.000...1 seconds whatever that number is ) than how can anyone say what was there at the moment of the big bang. Then by thinking logically, how could anyone say the universe came out of nothing at t=0, if t=0 is not calculable. To the op, it would seem more speculative than scientific.
     
  14. Sep 24, 2011 #13

    Chalnoth

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    Well, if that's the case, and probably also if it isn't, the answer can be found in simply noting that plain language simply cannot properly describe a concept that is, at its core, mathematical. Because natural language simply can't probably describe these sorts of concepts, you'll end up with apparently contradictory statements just because different people make different choices on how to try to explain something which can't really be explained.

    Underneath it all, there is a mathematical description which is consistent and is widely agreed-upon in the scientific community. If you see what seems to be an inconsistency, it's almost certainly because of this language barrier.
     
  15. Sep 24, 2011 #14
    From the title, I'm guessing the question is “Are there mathematical models that can go back to the Big Bang?”

    Not certain about references to “genius” or “grievous liars” :uhh:
     
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2011
  16. Sep 25, 2011 #15

    Chronos

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    This is all word salad ... pass the sauce.
     
  17. Sep 25, 2011 #16

    dst

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    Something like the CTMU perhaps?
     
  18. Sep 25, 2011 #17

    Ryan_m_b

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    Yrreg please provide specific quotes within context and with references from where you got them that these people say the universe sprang from nothing.

    Current cosmological models only go back to one unit of Planck time after the big bang.
     
  19. Sep 25, 2011 #18

    Chalnoth

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    Pretty sure the CTMU is just crackpottery dressed up in somewhat more sophisticated than average language.
     
  20. Sep 26, 2011 #19
    Agreed. I gave it all of 3 minutes and it didnt help me understand the U any better.
     
    Last edited: Sep 26, 2011
  21. Sep 26, 2011 #20

    Actually I started this thread in the philosophy board, but it has been moved to this place because of the word cosmologist, I guess.


    What am I about?

    Will they lock up this thread if I tell what I am about?

    Here, I am about getting people to notice that socalled scientific but atheist cosmologists are making monkey of language, using the word nothing but understanding something, like the universe came from nothing, so that ordinary people will come to think that the universe according to science did come from nothing, so there is no God creator needed whatsoever.


    But if scientists be also philosophers even though atheist, they will realize that no matter how they come to conclude about the material universe can be broken up into particles, and forces, and laws of physics whatever, all the components of the physical material universe put together still cannot make up the universe that is the factual universe in reality outside and beyond their scientific observation and experimentation and mathematical models, so that all the summation of the material or physical components of the material universe will not be equivalent to the reality of the factual universe as to produce a nose in man's face.


    [ To moderators, don't lock this thread, move it back to philosophy. ]




    Yrreg
     
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