Can I go from a Physics Bachelor's degree to a Comp Sci Master's?

In summary, I'm trying to figure out a plan for my future and I'm looking for advice on what to do next.
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Hi, I recently graduated with a Physics and (pure) Math double major but I'm having a bit of a crisis on where to go with my life. I'd like to pursue a Physics PhD, but I'm trying to think of a plan B in case that doesn't work out.

I have a general interest in math and programming, so I was wondering if I had a chance at getting a CS Masters at a well-ranked program. I have a 3.88 GPA from a top 10 school in the US, but took practically no CS courses (only an Intro to Java and Intro to Python course). As part of my physics research, I've created a few websites, modeled astronomical data and worked on a database. I was supervised by Physics professors who wrote rec letters for my physics PhD application, so perhaps I could ask them for letters for a CS application. I'd love to work for a company like Google, but I'm not sure how realistic that would be at this point.

Other than physics or CS, I'm really not sure what else I could see myself doing. I'm worried that I put all my eggs into one basket as an undergrad. I'd really appreciate any advice, thanks in advance!
 
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  • #2
SirLog said:
. I'd love to work for a company like Google, but I'm not sure how realistic that would be at this point.

You've already graduated? Just apply to a couple places and see what happens.
 
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  • #3
Before that, you might want to look at schools you are interested in and their mS admissions requirements.
 
  • #4
SirLog said:
Hi, I recently graduated with a Physics and (pure) Math double major but I'm having a bit of a crisis on where to go with my life. I'd like to pursue a Physics PhD, but I'm trying to think of a plan B in case that doesn't work out.

I have a general interest in math and programming, so I was wondering if I had a chance at getting a CS Masters at a well-ranked program. I have a 3.88 GPA from a top 10 school in the US, but took practically no CS courses (only an Intro to Java and Intro to Python course). As part of my physics research, I've created a few websites, modeled astronomical data and worked on a database. I was supervised by Physics professors who wrote rec letters for my physics PhD application, so perhaps I could ask them for letters for a CS application. I'd love to work for a company like Google, but I'm not sure how realistic that would be at this point.

Other than physics or CS, I'm really not sure what else I could see myself doing. I'm worried that I put all my eggs into one basket as an undergrad. I'd really appreciate any advice, thanks in advance!
What is the status of your physics PhD applications? Have you been accepted to any schools? If so, how have you responded?
 
  • #5
CrysPhys said:
What is the status of your physics PhD applications? Have you been accepted to any schools? If so, how have you responded?
I didn't have any luck with PhD admissions last fall. I'm planning on reapplying this year, but at this point I'm also trying to figure out a backup plan. I'm passionate for math and programming, so CS seems like it could be a good thing to pursue, but a lot of higher ranked schools expect some kind of background.

At this point I'm not really sure if it's worth it to apply to CS programs this year (given my lack of background and that I also have physics applications) or if it's better to prepare for a stronger application next year (e.g. taking some CS courses in the meantime). Nor do I really know how much of a chance I'll have at getting into well-ranked schools or how much the school's rank matters for pursuing a career in CS.
 
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1. Can I pursue a Master's degree in Computer Science with a Bachelor's degree in Physics?

Yes, it is possible to pursue a Master's degree in Computer Science with a Bachelor's degree in Physics. Many universities offer bridge programs or prerequisite courses to help students with non-Computer Science backgrounds transition into a Master's program in Computer Science.

2. Will I have to take additional courses to meet the requirements for a Master's in Computer Science?

It depends on the specific program and your background in Computer Science. Some Master's programs may require you to take additional courses to fulfill the necessary prerequisites, while others may offer a bridge program to help you catch up on any missing coursework.

3. How will my Bachelor's degree in Physics help me in a Master's program in Computer Science?

Your Bachelor's degree in Physics will provide you with a strong foundation in mathematics, problem-solving, and analytical thinking, which are all valuable skills in the field of Computer Science. Additionally, your knowledge of physics principles and concepts may be applicable in certain areas of Computer Science, such as data analysis and modeling.

4. Are there any specific areas of Computer Science that are more suitable for someone with a Physics background?

There is no one specific area of Computer Science that is more suitable for someone with a Physics background. However, your knowledge of physics may be particularly useful in fields such as computational physics, scientific computing, and data science.

5. Will I be at a disadvantage compared to students with a Bachelor's degree in Computer Science?

Not necessarily. While students with a Bachelor's degree in Computer Science may have a stronger foundation in programming and computer systems, your background in Physics may bring a unique perspective and set of skills to the table. Additionally, with the right preparation and coursework, you can acquire the necessary knowledge and skills to succeed in a Master's program in Computer Science.

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