Can I Use a 60amp Power Supply for a 24V Thermoelectric Cooler?

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In summary: But keep in mind that if you're going to do this, you might as well just get a 12V unit in the first place and not risk damage to the TEC.If that is indeed the case (and you can get inside) then rewiring the unit would be an option. But keep in mind that if you're going to do this, you might as well just get a 12V unit in the first place and not risk damage to the TEC.
  • #1
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Ok guys...I don't profess to fully grasp the Amps to Voltage correlation...so this may be a painfully easy and silly question...but here it goes.

Is there a reasonable way to test this:
tetech.com
LC200 thermoelectric cooler
Spec:
200 Watt
24VDC
16.8 Amp
FAN: 24V@0.85 Amp


...with this Tenma HD 60amp
Specifications:
•Output Voltage: 1~15VDC
•Output Current: 60A
•Load regulation: 0.1% +5mV
•Line regulation: 0.05% +3mV
•Ripple and noise: 40mV (p-p)
•Efficiency: 85%
•Meter accuracy: ±1% +1 count
•Power requirements: 120VAC, 60Hz

If not, can I convert it or rewire it? Thanks.

Jesse
 
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  • #2
Welcome to PF.

Power supplies are listed showing their maximum current.
The current they produce in operation is dependent on the impedance of the load.
E=IR is the relationship.

In this case the LC200 doc says it needs 24V.
Your power supply only produces a maximum potential of 15V.
So it's not going to work.

http://www.tetech.com/docs/LC-200.pdf [Broken]
 
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  • #3
Thank you for the welcome.

I can appreciate that...but as I look at this TEC and fan it appears to be nothing more than a massive aluminum heat sink, block, a fan, a shroud, and wires. No processor or anything special. Can I modify the wiring to use a 12v system?
 
  • #4
If it has multiple cooling modules wired in series then it should be doable.
Not having one of these units, I can't tell you how it is wired.
 
  • #5
blckonyxx said:
I can appreciate that...but as I look at this TEC and fan it appears to be nothing more than a massive aluminum heat sink, block, a fan, a shroud, and wires. No processor or anything special. Can I modify the wiring to use a 12v system?
A TEC is a semiconductor device that has specific performance properties. Think of it the same way as you would think about an electric heater: If it is rated for 24V, it really does need 24V to make it work at its maximum potential. You can certainly run it at 12V, though - just at a lower output.

Perhaps the manufacturer has a performance curve they can provide you with. Check their website. Example: http://www.overclockers.com/tips45/ [Broken]
 
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  • #6
russ_watters said:
A TEC is a semiconductor device that has specific performance properties. Think of it the same way as you would think about an electric heater: If it is rated for 24V, it really does need 24V to make it work at its maximum potential. You can certainly run it at 12V, though - just at a lower output.

Perhaps the manufacturer has a performance curve they can provide you with. Check their website. Example: http://www.overclockers.com/tips45/ [Broken]
True.
But the individual peltier devices I've seen have a substantially lower voltage requirement.
So chances are there are several wired in series.
If that is indeed the case (and you can get inside) then rewiring the unit would be an option.
 
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